IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/cpr/ceprdp/1189.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

On Measuring the Costs of Labour Immobility and Market Heterogeneity in Europe

Author

Listed:
  • Demertzis, Maria
  • Hughes Hallett, Andrew

Abstract

In this paper we evaluate the deterioration in the European sacrifice ratio implied (both in terms of inflation and unemployment) by the fact that labour markets are structurally different and there is very little labour mobility between the European Union countries. We also consider a wage transfer effect implied by Germany's dominance. We discover that the maldistribution of unemployment rates and Germany's leadership role impose a great cost on the real side. Germany and Spain are the two countries that contribute the largest costs since they represent the two opposite extremes of the unemployment distribution.

Suggested Citation

  • Demertzis, Maria & Hughes Hallett, Andrew, 1995. "On Measuring the Costs of Labour Immobility and Market Heterogeneity in Europe," CEPR Discussion Papers 1189, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:1189
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.cepr.org/active/publications/discussion_papers/dp.php?dpno=1189
    Download Restriction: CEPR Discussion Papers are free to download for our researchers, subscribers and members. If you fall into one of these categories but have trouble downloading our papers, please contact us at subscribers@cepr.org

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Tani, Massimiliano, 2003. "Have Europeans become more mobile? A note on regional evolutions in the EU: 1988-1997," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 80(1), pages 23-30, July.
    2. Toni Mora & Jordi Lopez-Tamayo & Jordi Surinach, 2005. "Are wages and productivity converging simultaneously in Euro-area countries?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(17), pages 2001-2008.
    3. Demertzis, Maria & Hallett, Andrew Hughes, 1998. "Asymmetric transmission mechanisms and the rise in European unemployment: A case of structural differences or of policy failures?," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 22(6), pages 869-886, June.
    4. Agiomirgianakis, George M., 1998. "Monetary Policy Games and International Migration of Labor in Interdependent Economies," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 243-266, April.
    5. Agiomirgianakis, George & Zervoyianni, Athina, 2001. "Macroeconomic equilibrium with illegal immigration," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 181-202, April.
    6. Fousekis, Panos, 2007. "Cost Competitiveness in the Food, Beverages and Tobacco Manufacturing of the EU and the USA: A Convergence Analysis," Agricultural Economics Review, Greek Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 8(2), June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Heterogeneity; Measuring Sacrifice Ratios; Segmented Labour Markets; Wage Leadership;

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:1189. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.