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A reformulation of the Harris-Todaro mechanism with endogenous wages

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  • Moene, Karl Ove

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  • Moene, Karl Ove, 1988. "A reformulation of the Harris-Todaro mechanism with endogenous wages," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 387-390.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:27:y:1988:i:4:p:387-390
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    Cited by:

    1. MacLeod, W Bentley & Malcomson, James M, 1998. "Motivation and Markets," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(3), pages 388-411, June.
    2. Mathan Satchi & Jonathan Temple, 2006. "Growth and labour markets in developing countries," CEDI Discussion Paper Series 06-12, Centre for Economic Development and Institutions(CEDI), Brunel University.
    3. Khan, M. Ali Khan, 2007. "The Harris-Todaro Hypothesis," MPRA Paper 2201, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Fields,Gary S., 2005. "A guide to multisector labor market models," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 32547, The World Bank.
    5. Lall, Somik V. & Selod, Harris & Shalizi, Zmarak, 2006. "Rural-urban migration in developing countries : a survey of theoretical predictions and empirical findings," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3915, The World Bank.
    6. Fields, Gary S., 2005. "A welfare economic analysis of labor market policies in the Harris-Todaro model," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(1), pages 127-146, February.
    7. repec:esx:essedp:729 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Ravi Kanbur & Luc Christiaensen & Joachim De Weerdt, 2019. "Where to create jobs to reduce poverty: cities or towns?," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 17(4), pages 543-564, December.
    9. Zenou, Yves, 2005. "The Todaro Paradox Revisited," IZA Discussion Papers 1861, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    10. Mathan Satchi & Jonathan Temple, 2009. "Labor Markets and Productivity in Developing Countries," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 12(1), pages 183-204, January.
    11. Breinlich, Holger & Ottaviano, Gianmarco I.P. & Temple, Jonathan R.W., 2014. "Regional Growth and Regional Decline," Handbook of Economic Growth, in: Philippe Aghion & Steven Durlauf (ed.), Handbook of Economic Growth, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 4, pages 683-779, Elsevier.
    12. Lee, Chul-In, 2008. "Migration and the wage and unemployment gaps between urban and non-urban sectors: A dynamic general equilibrium reinterpretation of the Harris-Todaro equilibrium," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(6), pages 1416-1434, December.
    13. Jasper van Dijk, 2015. "Investing in lagging regions is efficient: a local multipliers analysis of U.S. cities," ERSA conference papers ersa15p146, European Regional Science Association.
    14. Monteforte, Fabio, 2020. "Structural change, the push-pull hypothesis and the Spanish labour market," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 148-169.
    15. Yves Zenou, 2011. "Rural–Urban Migration And Unemployment: Theory And Policy Implications," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(1), pages 65-82, February.
    16. Jonathan Temple, 2002. "The Costs of Dualism," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 02/532, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    17. Esfahani, Hadi Salehi & Mookherjee, Dilip, 1995. "Productivity, contracting modes, and development," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 203-231, April.
    18. Huikang Ying, 2015. "Labour Informality, Selective Migration, and Productivity in General Equilibrium," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 15/653, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    19. Carter, Thomas J., 1998. "Urban productivity, urban unemployment, and labor market policies," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 329-344, May.
    20. Chul‐In Lee, 2010. "Can Search‐Matching Models Explain Migration And Wage And Unemployment Gaps In Developing Economies? A Calibration Approach," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(2), pages 635-654, May.
    21. Basu, Bharati, 2018. "The role of behavioral choices in reducing wage inequality in developing countries," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 355-363.

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