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The costs of dualism

  • Temple, Jonathan

    (Unifversity of Bristol)

This paper shows how to calibrate a two-sector general equilibrium model of production using a small number of parameter assumptions and readily available data. The framework is then used to analyze the costs of labor market dualism. The paper quantifies the effects of rural-urban wage differentials and urban unemployment on total output, wages and returns to capital, factor shares, and sectoral structure. One of the main findings is that labor market rigidities can have a major impact on the extent of industrialization.

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Paper provided by Royal Economic Society in its series Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2003 with number 201.

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Date of creation: 04 Jun 2003
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Handle: RePEc:ecj:ac2003:201
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  1. Mincer, Jacob, 1976. "Unemployment Effects of Minimum Wages," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 84(4), pages S87-104, August.
  2. Robinson, Sherman, 1989. "Multisectoral models," Handbook of Development Economics, in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 18, pages 885-947 Elsevier.
  3. Charles A. Ingene, 2001. "The State of the Art in Modeling Migration in LDCS: A Comment," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(3), pages 529-543.
  4. Jeremiah. Allen, 2001. "The State of the Art in Modeling Migration in the LDCS: A Comment," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(3), pages 521-528.
  5. Bourguignon, F. & Morrisson, C., 1995. "Inequality and Development: The Role of Dualism," DELTA Working Papers 95-32, DELTA (Ecole normale supérieure).
  6. W. Bentley MacLeod & James Malcomson, 1997. "Motivation and Markets," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 339., Boston College Department of Economics.
  7. Magnac, Th, 1991. "Segmented or Competitive Labor Markets," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 59(1), pages 165-87, January.
  8. Yabuuchi, Shigemi, 1993. "Urban unemployment, international capital mobility and development policy," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 399-403, August.
  9. Klump, Rainer & Preissler, Harald, 2000. " CES Production Functions and Economic Growth," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 102(1), pages 41-56, March.
  10. de Melo, Jaime A P, 1977. "Distortions in the Factor Market: Some General Equilibrium Estimates," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 59(4), pages 398-405, November.
  11. Bryan S. Graham & Jonathan R. W. Temple, 2004. "Rich nations, poor nations: how much can multiple equilibria explain?," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp017, IIIS.
  12. Rosenzweig, Mark R., 1988. "Labor markets in low-income countries," Handbook of Development Economics, in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 15, pages 713-762 Elsevier.
  13. Moene, Karl Ove, 1988. "A reformulation of the Harris-Todaro mechanism with endogenous wages," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 387-390.
  14. Fields, Gary S., 1997. "Wage floors and unemployment: A two-sector analysis," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 4(1), pages 85-91, March.
  15. Hatton, Timothy J. & Williamson, Jeffrey G., 1991. "Integrated and Segmented Labor Markets: Thinking in Two Sectors," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 51(02), pages 413-425, June.
  16. Chao, Chi-Chur & Yu, Eden S. H., 1992. "Capital markets, urban unemployment and land," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 407-413, April.
  17. Albert Fishlow & Paul A. David, 1961. "Optimal Resource Allocation in an Imperfect Market Setting," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 69, pages 529.
  18. Freeman, Richard B, 1993. "Labor Markets and Institutions in Economic Development," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(2), pages 403-08, May.
  19. Corden, W M & Findlay, Ronald, 1975. "Urban Unemployment, Intersectoral Capital Mobility and Development Policy," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 42(165), pages 59-78, February.
  20. Jones, Ronald W, 1971. "Distortions in Factor Markets and the General Equilibrium Model of Production," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 79(3), pages 437-59, May-June.
  21. Basu, Kaushik C, 1980. "Optimal Policies in Dual Economies," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 95(1), pages 187-96, August.
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