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Happiness, taxes and social provision: A note

Author

Listed:
  • Albanese, Marina
  • Bonasia, Mariangela
  • Napolitano, Oreste
  • Spagnolo, Nicola

Abstract

This paper has analyzed the effects of the ratio between taxes and social provision on population well-being for ten European countries. The linkages between what citizens would expect in return of the taxes paid and their well-being have clearly become stronger after the crisis and it should be taken into account in the debate on public policies and how these translates in population well-being.

Suggested Citation

  • Albanese, Marina & Bonasia, Mariangela & Napolitano, Oreste & Spagnolo, Nicola, 2015. "Happiness, taxes and social provision: A note," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 135(C), pages 100-103.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:135:y:2015:i:c:p:100-103
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econlet.2015.07.029
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Happiness; Panel cointegration; Social provision;

    JEL classification:

    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes
    • D60 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - General
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General

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