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Missing wages: How to test for biased estimates in wage functions?

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  • Fertig, Michael
  • Görlitz, Katja

Abstract

This paper investigates how to test for nonresponse selection bias in wage functions induced by missing income information. We suggest an “easy-to-implement” approach which requires information on interviewer IDs and the interview date rather than hard-to-get interviewer characteristics.

Suggested Citation

  • Fertig, Michael & Görlitz, Katja, 2013. "Missing wages: How to test for biased estimates in wage functions?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 118(2), pages 269-271.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:118:y:2013:i:2:p:269-271
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econlet.2012.10.036
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Christopher R. Bollinger & Barry T. Hirsch, 2013. "Is Earnings Nonresponse Ignorable?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 95(2), pages 407-416, May.
    2. Regina Riphahn & Oliver Serfling, 2005. "Item non-response on income and wealth questions," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 30(2), pages 521-538, September.
    3. Jacob A. Mincer, 1974. "Introduction to "Schooling, Experience, and Earnings"," NBER Chapters, in: Schooling, Experience, and Earnings, pages 1-4, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Zweimuller, Josef, 1992. "Survey non-response and biases in wage regressions," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 105-109, May.
    5. Stephen P. Jenkins & Lorenzo Cappellari & Peter Lynn & Annette Jäckle & Emanuela Sala, 2006. "Patterns of consent: evidence from a general household survey," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 169(4), pages 701-722, October.
    6. Jacob A. Mincer, 1974. "Schooling, Experience, and Earnings," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number minc74-1, April.
    7. Sala, Emanuela & Burton, Jonathan & Knies, Gundi, 2010. "Correlates of obtaining informed consent to data linkage: respondent, interview and interviewer characteristics," ISER Working Paper Series 2010-28, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    8. Stefan Bender & Michael Fertig & Katja Görlitz & Martina Huber & Alexandra Schmucker, 2009. "WeLL – Unique Linked Employer-Employee Data on Further Training in Germany," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 129(4), pages 637-643.
    9. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
    10. Alfonso Sousa-Poza & Fred Henneberger, 2000. "Wage data collected by telephone interviews: an empirical analysis of the item nonresponse problem and its implications for the estimation of wage functions," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 136(I), pages 79-98, March.
    11. Emanuela Sala & Jonathan Burton & Gundi Knies, 2012. "Correlates of Obtaining Informed Consent to Data Linkage," Sociological Methods & Research, , vol. 41(3), pages 414-439, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Massimiliano Castellani & Pierpaolo Pattitoni & Antonello Eugenio Scorcu, 2018. "On the relationship between reserve prices and low estimates in art auctions," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 42(1), pages 45-56, February.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Item nonresponse; Wages; Selection model;

    JEL classification:

    • J30 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - General

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