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Deriving the labour supply curve from happiness data


  • Dockery, Alfred M.


An alternative empirical method to estimating the labour supply function is proposed, based upon subjective wellbeing data. It potentially addresses limitations of the standard neo-classical approach by allowing workers’ observed hours worked to deviate from their utility maximising point.

Suggested Citation

  • Dockery, Alfred M., 2012. "Deriving the labour supply curve from happiness data," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 117(3), pages 898-900.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:117:y:2012:i:3:p:898-900 DOI: 10.1016/j.econlet.2012.07.002

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Blundell, Richard & Macurdy, Thomas, 1999. "Labor supply: A review of alternative approaches," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 27, pages 1559-1695 Elsevier.
    2. Bruno S. Frey & Alois Stutzer, 2002. "What Can Economists Learn from Happiness Research?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 40(2), pages 402-435, June.
    3. Ada Ferrer-i-Carbonell & Paul Frijters, 2004. "How Important is Methodology for the estimates of the determinants of Happiness?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(497), pages 641-659, July.
    4. Bruno S. Frey, 2008. "Happiness: A Revolution in Economics," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262062771, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Alfred Michael Dockery & Sherry Bawa, 2014. "Is working from home good or bad work? Evidence from Australian employees," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1402, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
    2. Alfred Michael Dockery & Sherry Bawa, 2015. "When two worlds collude: working from home and family functioning," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1504, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.

    More about this item


    Subjective wellbeing; Labour supply; Working hours;

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply


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