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The reality of reality television: Does reality TV influence local crime rates?

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  • Chiou, Lesley
  • Lopez, Mary

Abstract

Overnight celebrity status of reality-based television cast members and filming locations may result in negative outcomes such as increased crime. Using a popular reality show filmed in Laguna Beach, we employ a difference-in-differences approach to analyze changes in the city's crime rates.

Suggested Citation

  • Chiou, Lesley & Lopez, Mary, 2010. "The reality of reality television: Does reality TV influence local crime rates?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 108(3), pages 330-333, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:108:y:2010:i:3:p:330-333
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gordon Dahl & Stefano DellaVigna, 2009. "Does Movie Violence Increase Violent Crime?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 124(2), pages 677-734.
    2. Philip H. Brown & Jessica H. Minty, 2008. "Media Coverage and Charitable Giving after the 2004 Tsunami," Southern Economic Journal, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 75(1), pages 9-25, July.
    3. David Card & Gordon B. Dahl, 2011. "Family Violence and Football: The Effect of Unexpected Emotional Cues on Violent Behavior," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 126(1), pages 103-143.
    4. Matthew Gentzkow & Jesse M. Shapiro, 2008. "Preschool Television Viewing and Adolescent Test Scores: Historical Evidence from the Coleman Study," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 123(1), pages 279-323.
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    Cited by:

    1. Concetta Castiglione & Roberto Zanola, 2019. "The Demand and Supply for Popular Culture: Evidence from Italian Circuses," Italian Economic Journal: A Continuation of Rivista Italiana degli Economisti and Giornale degli Economisti, Springer;Società Italiana degli Economisti (Italian Economic Association), vol. 5(3), pages 349-367, October.
    2. Craig A. Depken & Tomislav Globan & Ivan Kožić, 2020. "Television-Induced Tourism: Evidence from Croatia," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 48(2), pages 253-262, June.
    3. Melissa S. Kearney & Phillip B. Levine, 2015. "Media Influences on Social Outcomes: The Impact of MTV's 16 and Pregnant on Teen Childbearing," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 105(12), pages 3597-3632, December.
    4. Julianne Treme & Lee A. Craig, 2013. "Celebrity star power: Do age and gender effects influence box office performance?," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(5), pages 440-445, March.

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    Keywords

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