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Risk attitudes and reservation wages of unemployed workers: Evidence from panel data


  • Pannenberg, Markus


This paper studies risk attitudes of unemployed job seekers and their relationship to self-reported reservation wages. We find that risk aversion is prevalent, and that reservation wages decrease slightly over time. Furthermore, risk aversion and reservation wages are negatively correlated.

Suggested Citation

  • Pannenberg, Markus, 2010. "Risk attitudes and reservation wages of unemployed workers: Evidence from panel data," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 106(3), pages 223-226, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:106:y:2010:i:3:p:223-226

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Daron Acemoglu & Robert Shimer, 1999. "Efficient Unemployment Insurance," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(5), pages 893-928, October.
    2. Cox, James C & Oaxaca, Ronald L, 1992. "Direct Tests of the Reservation Wage Property," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 102(415), pages 1423-1432, November.
    3. Robert Shimer & Iván Werning, 2007. "Reservation Wages and Unemployment Insurance," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 122(3), pages 1145-1185.
    4. Armin Falk & Ernst Fehr & Christian Zehnder, "undated". "The Behavioral Effects of Minimum Wages," IEW - Working Papers 247, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.
    5. Braunstein, Yale M & Schotter, Andrew, 1982. "Labor Market Search: An Experimental Study," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 20(1), pages 133-144, January.
    6. Schotter, Andrew & Braunstein, Yale M, 1981. "Economic Search: An Experimental Study," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 19(1), pages 1-25, January.
    7. Gert G. Wagner & Joachim R. Frick & Jürgen Schupp, 2007. "The German Socio-Economic Panel Study (SOEP) – Scope, Evolution and Enhancements," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 127(1), pages 139-169.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hetschko, Clemens & Preuss, Malte, 2015. "Income in Jeopardy: How losing employment affects the willingness to take risks," Discussion Papers 2015/32, Free University Berlin, School of Business & Economics.
    2. repec:spr:jlabre:v:38:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s12122-017-9247-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Caliendo, Marco & Künn, Steffen & Weißenberger, Martin, 2016. "Personality traits and the evaluation of start-up subsidies," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 87-108.
    4. Rinne, Ulf & Schüller, Simone & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2010. "Ethnische Vielfalt und Arbeitsmarkterfolg," IZA Standpunkte 34, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Thomas Huizen & Janneke Plantenga, 2014. "Job Search Behaviour and Time Preferences: Testing Exponential Versus Hyperbolic Discounting," De Economist, Springer, vol. 162(3), pages 223-245, September.
    6. Stephan Humpert & Christian Pfeifer, 2011. "Explaining Age and Gender Differences in Employment Rates: A Labor Supply Side Perspective," Working Paper Series in Economics 214, University of Lüneburg, Institute of Economics.
    7. Amelie F. Constant & Annabelle Krause & Ulf Rinne & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2011. "Economic preferences and attitudes of the unemployed: Are natives and second generation migrants alike?," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 32(7), pages 825-851, October.
    8. T.M. van Huizen & Rob Alessie, 2016. "Risk Aversion and Job Mobility," Working Papers 16-09, Utrecht School of Economics.
    9. repec:eee:jeborg:v:136:y:2017:i:c:p:161-173 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Falco, Paolo, 2014. "Does risk matter for occupational choices? Experimental evidence from an African labour market," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 96-109.
    11. Marco Caliendo & Robert Mahlstedt & Oscar A. Mitnik, 2014. "Unobservable, but Unimportant?: The Influence of Personality Traits (and Other Usually Unobserved Variables) for the Evaluation of Labor Market Policies," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1407, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    12. repec:eee:labeco:v:46:y:2017:i:c:p:14-25 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Nordlund, Madelende & Strandh, Mattias, 2014. "The relation between economic and non-economic incentives to work and employment chances among the unemployed," Working Paper Series 2014:23, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    14. Caliendo, Marco & Mahlstedt, Robert & Mitnik, Oscar, 2014. "Unobservable, but Unimportant? The Influence of Personality Traits (and Other Usually Unobserved Variables) for the Estimation of Treatment Effects," Annual Conference 2014 (Hamburg): Evidence-based Economic Policy 100502, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.


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