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Does money still matter for U.S. output?

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  • Berger, Helge
  • Österholm, Pär

Abstract

In this note, we use an out-of-sample approach to investigate whether money growth Granger-causes output growth in the United States. We find that after the 'Great moderation,' the Granger-causal role of money appears to have vanished completely.

Suggested Citation

  • Berger, Helge & Österholm, Pär, 2009. "Does money still matter for U.S. output?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 102(3), pages 143-146, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:102:y:2009:i:3:p:143-146
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Maral Kichian, 2012. "Financial Conditions and the Money-Output Relationship in Canada," Staff Working Papers 12-33, Bank of Canada.
    2. Österholm, Pär, 2012. "The limited usefulness of macroeconomic Bayesian VARs when estimating the probability of a US recession," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 76-86.
    3. Pär Österholm, 2010. "Improving Unemployment Rate Forecasts Using Survey Data," Finnish Economic Papers, Finnish Economic Association, vol. 23(1), pages 16-26, Spring.
    4. Caraiani, Petre, 2016. "Money and output causality: A structural approach," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 220-236.
    5. Petre Caraiani, 2014. "Do money and financial variables help forecasting output in emerging European Economies?," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 46(2), pages 743-763, March.
    6. Albuquerque, Bruno & Baumann, Ursel & Seitz, Franz, 2016. "What does money and credit tell us about real activity in the United States?," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 328-347.
    7. Mallick, Sushanta & Matousek, Roman & Tzeremes, Nickolaos G., 2016. "Financial development and productive inefficiency: A robust conditional directional distance function approach," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 145(C), pages 196-201.
    8. Caraiani, Petre, 2012. "Money and output: New evidence based on wavelet coherence," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 116(3), pages 547-550.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Bayesian VAR Out-of-sample forecasting Granger causality Federal Reserve Volcker;

    JEL classification:

    • E47 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • C53 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Forecasting and Prediction Models; Simulation Methods
    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models

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