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Money-output Granger causality revisited: An empirical analysis of EU countries

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  • Hayo, Bernd

Abstract

In this paper, the evidence collected in the large literature on testing for Granger-causality from money to output is revisited. Using a broad data base of 14 EU-countries plus Canada, the US and Japan, and quarterly data from the mid 60s to the mid 90s, a number of hypotheses from this literature is evaluated. It is found that very few general conclusions can be sustained. For instance, in most countries it is not the case that the use of data in levels creates a bias in favour of finding Granger-causality effects of money on output compared to using differences. Neither does the significance of money lags decline when increasing the number of variables included in the model. What appears to be robust, though, is that allowing for asymmetries clearly increases the likelihood of finding significant causality effects. Based on the Grangercausality test results, a number of country groups are obtained using cluster analysis, which are characterised by a similar behaviour with respect to the money-output relation.

Suggested Citation

  • Hayo, Bernd, 1998. "Money-output Granger causality revisited: An empirical analysis of EU countries," ZEI Working Papers B 08-1998, University of Bonn, ZEI - Center for European Integration Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:zeiwps:b081998
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    Cited by:

    1. Simplice Asongu, 2014. "How Would Monetary Policy Matter In The Proposed African Monetary Unions? Evidence From Output And Prices," The African Finance Journal, Africagrowth Institute, vol. 16(2), pages 34-63.
    2. Simplice Asongu, 2016. "New empirics of monetary policy dynamics: evidence from the CFA franc zones," African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 7(2), pages 164-204, June.
    3. Simplice A. Asongu, 2014. "Does money matter in Africa?: New empirics on long- and short-run effects of monetary policy on output and prices," Indian Growth and Development Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 7(2), pages 142-180, November.
    4. Büttner, David & Hayo, Bernd, 2010. "News and correlations of CEEC-3 financial markets," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 915-922, September.
    5. Lang, Dimut, 1999. "Die Geldmenge und ihre bilanziellen Gegenposten: Ein Vergleich zwischen wichtigen Ländern der Europäischen Währungsunion," Discussion Paper Series 1: Economic Studies 1999,01, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    6. Lahura, Erick, 2010. "Monetary aggregates and monetary policy: an empirical assessment for Peru," Working Papers 2010-019, Banco Central de Reserva del Perú.
    7. Masoud Moghaddam, 2010. "Co-integrated money in the production function-evidence and implications," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(8), pages 957-963.
    8. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:3:y:2008:i:61:p:1-14 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. R. W. Hafer & Ali M. Kutan, 2002. "Detrending and the Money-Output Link: International Evidence," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 69(1), pages 159-174, July.
    10. Simplice A. Asongu, 2014. "Correcting Inflation with Financial Dynamic Fundamentals: Which Adjustments Matter in Africa?," Journal of African Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(1), pages 64-73, April.
    11. Berger, Helge & Österholm, Pär, 2009. "Does money still matter for U.S. output?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 102(3), pages 143-146, March.
    12. Ryan S. Mattson & Philippe De Peretti, 2014. "Investigating the Role of Real Divisia Money in Persistence-Robust Econometric Models," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-00984827, HAL.
    13. Jan Marc Berk & Gerbert Hebbink, 2006. "The anchoring of European inflation expectations," DNB Working Papers 116, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    14. Yannis Panagopoulos & Aristotelis Spiliotis, 2006. "Testing Money Supply Endogeneity: The Case of Greece (1975-1998)," European Research Studies Journal, European Research Studies Journal, vol. 0(1-2), pages 85-102.
    15. repec:eco:journ2:2017-03-21 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Jürgen von Hagen, 2004. "Hat die Geldmenge ausgedient?," Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 5(4), pages 423-453, November.
    17. Daniel Ventosa-Santaulària & José Eduardo Vera-Valdés, 2008. "Granger-Causality in the presence of structural breaks," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 3(61), pages 1-14.
    18. Miyakoshi, Tatsuyoshi & Jalolov, Mirzosharif, 2005. "Money-income causality revisited in EGARCH: Spillovers of monetary policy to Asia from the US," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 299-313, April.
    19. Tae-Hwy Lee & Weiping Yang, 2014. "Money-Income Granger-Causality in Quantiles," Working Papers 201423, University of California at Riverside, Department of Economics, revised Sep 2012.
    20. J. Weymark & H. König & J. Backhaus & B. Hayo & A. Gabriele, 2001. "Book reviews," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 73(3), pages 348-368, October.
    21. Rodriguez, Gabriel & Rowe, Nicholas, 2007. "Why U.S. money does not cause U.S. output, but does cause Hong Kong output," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 26(7), pages 1174-1186, November.
    22. Ryan S. Mattson & Philippe De Peretti, 2014. "Investigating the Role of Real Divisia Money in Persistence-Robust Econometric Models," Working Papers hal-00984827, HAL.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Money-Output Causality; Granger Causality; EU countries;

    JEL classification:

    • E40 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - General
    • E50 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - General

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