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The market for bushmeat: Colobus Satanas on Bioko Island

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  • Morra, Wayne
  • Hearn, Gail
  • Buck, Andrew J.

Abstract

Species conservation is an important issue worldwide. The market for monkeys consumed as food on Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea, is modeled as a bargaining game. The bargaining set-up leads to the conclusion that black colobus are being over-hunted. Using daily data an empirical density is fit to the price-quantity pairs resulting from exchange between buyers and retailers. The density provides support for the bargaining model. Quantile regressions are also fit to the data. The median quantile indicates buyers have greater bargaining power than retailers. Knowing who has bargaining power aids in the design of policy to reduce bushmeat hunting. Strategic elasticities are constructed from the quantiles. Given the harvest rate of monkeys and the elasticity estimates, the monkeys of Bioko Island are under considerable pressure.

Suggested Citation

  • Morra, Wayne & Hearn, Gail & Buck, Andrew J., 2009. "The market for bushmeat: Colobus Satanas on Bioko Island," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(10), pages 2619-2626, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:68:y:2009:i:10:p:2619-2626
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    References listed on IDEAS

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