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The costs of land degradation in Sub-Saharan Africa

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  • Bojo, Jan

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  • Bojo, Jan, 1996. "The costs of land degradation in Sub-Saharan Africa," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 161-173, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:16:y:1996:i:2:p:161-173
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Larson, Bruce A., 1994. "Changing the economics of environmental degradation in Madagascar: Lessons from the national environmental action plan process," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 22(5), pages 671-689, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. World Bank, 2007. "Nigeria - An Economic Analysis of Natural Resources Sustainability : Land Tenure and Land Degradation Issues," World Bank Other Operational Studies 7947, The World Bank.
    2. Naude, Wim, 2008. "Conflict, Disasters, and No Jobs: Reasons for International Migration from Sub-Saharan Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series 085, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    3. Nakhumwa, TO & Hassan, RM, 2003. "The Adoption Of Soil Conservation Technologies By Smallholder Farmers In Malawi: A Selective Tobit Analysis," Agrekon, Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA), vol. 42(3), September.
    4. Ketema, Mengistu & Bauer, Siegfried, 2012. "Factors Affecting Intercropping and Conservation Tillage Practices in Eastern Ethiopia," AGRIS on-line Papers in Economics and Informatics, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Faculty of Economics and Management, vol. 4(1), March.
    5. Scherr, Sara J., 1999. "Soil degradation: a threat to developing-country food security by 2020?," 2020 vision discussion papers 27, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    6. Salvati, Luca & Carlucci, Margherita, 2010. "Estimating land degradation risk for agriculture in Italy using an indirect approach," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(3), pages 511-518, January.
    7. Costanza, Robert, 1997. "Editorial : Just rewards: Herman Daly, the Heineken Environmental Prize, and the Ecological Economics best article award," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 1-4, July.
    8. Prasopchoke Mongsawad, 2010. "The Philosophy of Sufficiency Economy: a contribution to the theory of development," Asia-Pacific Development Journal, United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), vol. 17(1), pages 123-143, June.
    9. Balana, Bedru Babulo & Muys, Bart & Haregeweyn, Nigussie & Descheemaeker, Katrien & Deckers, Jozef & Poesen, Jean & Nyssen, Jan & Mathijs, Erik, 2012. "Cost-benefit analysis of soil and water conservation measure: The case of exclosures in northern Ethiopia," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(C), pages 27-36.
    10. Drechsel, Pay & Gyiele, Lucy & Kunze, Dagmar & Cofie, Olufunke, 2001. "Population density, soil nutrient depletion, and economic growth in sub-Saharan Africa," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 251-258, August.
    11. Rakesh Paliwal & Gejo Geevarghese & P. Ram Babu & P. Khanna, 1999. "Valuation of Landmass Degradation Using Fuzzy Hedonic Method: A Case Study of National Capital Region," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 14(4), pages 519-543, December.
    12. Teddie Nakhumwa & Rashid Hassan, 2012. "Optimal Management of Soil Quality Stocks and Long-Term Consequences of Land Degradation for Smallholder Farmers in Malawi," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 52(3), pages 415-433, July.
    13. Diao, Xinshen & Sarpong, Daniel B., 2007. "Cost implications of agricultural land degradation in Ghana:," IFPRI discussion papers 698, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    14. World Bank, 2008. "Uganda Sustainable Land Management : Public Expenditure Review," World Bank Other Operational Studies 16807, The World Bank.

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