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Does educational expansion encourage female workforce participation? A study of the 1968 reform in Taiwan

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  • Tsai, Wehn-Jyuan
  • Liu, Jin-Tan
  • Chou, Shin-Yi
  • Thornton, Robert

Abstract

Between 1968 and 1973 the Taiwanese government undertook the most extensive expansion on record of the public junior high school system in Taiwan. This study analyzes the effects of the 1968 education reform and subsequent high school expansion on gender disparities in employment generally, as well in different sectors and classes of employment. Our results show that the education expansion exerted a major influence on the reallocation of female workers across various sectors and types of employment, thereby contributing to the efficient reallocation of females in the Taiwan economy.

Suggested Citation

  • Tsai, Wehn-Jyuan & Liu, Jin-Tan & Chou, Shin-Yi & Thornton, Robert, 2009. "Does educational expansion encourage female workforce participation? A study of the 1968 reform in Taiwan," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 750-758, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:28:y:2009:i:6:p:750-758
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Yamauchi, Futoshi & Tiongco, Marites, 2013. "Why women are progressive in education? Gender disparities in human capital, labor markets, and family arrangement in the Philippines," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 196-206.
    2. Murat G. Kırdar & Meltem Dayıoğlu & İsmet Koç, 2016. "Does Longer Compulsory Education Equalize Schooling by Gender and Rural/Urban Residence?," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 30(3), pages 549-579.
    3. Alpay Filiztekin & Can Karahasan, 2015. "The Effect of Compulsory Schooling on Spatial Distribution of Educational Attainment," ERSA conference papers ersa15p580, European Regional Science Association.
    4. K?rdar,Murat G. & Day?o?lu,Meltem & Koç,?smet, 2015. "Does longer compulsory education equalize schooling by gender and rural/urban residence ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7377, The World Bank.
    5. Hung-Hao Chang & Pei-An Liao, 2015. "Are Immigrant Wives Happy in Taiwan? A Look at the Role of Bargaining Power Within the Married Couples," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 16(2), pages 295-312, April.

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    Keywords

    Human capital Resource allocation;

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