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Does watching television rot your mind? Estimates of the effect on test scores

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  • Zavodny, Madeline

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  • Zavodny, Madeline, 2006. "Does watching television rot your mind? Estimates of the effect on test scores," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 565-573, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:25:y:2006:i:5:p:565-573
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Juster, F Thomas & Stafford, Frank P, 1991. "The Allocation of Time: Empirical Findings, Behavioral Models, and Problems of Measurement," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 29(2), pages 471-522, June.
    2. William Rodgers & William Spriggs, 1996. "What does the AFQT really measure: Race, wages, schooling and the AFQT score," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 24(4), pages 13-46, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Robert W. Fairlie & Samantha H. Grunberg, 2014. "Access To Technology And The Transfer Function Of Community Colleges: Evidence From A Field Experiment," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 52(3), pages 1040-1059, July.
    2. Fali Huang & Myoung-jae Lee, 2009. "Does Television Viewing Affect Children'S Behaviour?," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 14(4), pages 474-501, October.
    3. Fali Huang & Myoung-Jae Lee, 2010. "Dynamic treatment effect analysis of TV effects on child cognitive development," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(3), pages 392-419.
    4. Brown, Sarah & Taylor, Karl, 2009. "Social interaction and children's academic test scores: Evidence from the National Child Development Study," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 563-574, August.
    5. Eliana La Ferrara, 2016. "Mass Media And Social Change: Can We Use Television To Fight Poverty?," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 14(4), pages 791-827, August.
    6. NAKAMURO Makiko & INUI Tomohiko & SENOH Wataru & HIROMATSU Takeshi, 2013. "Are Television and Video Games Really Harmful for Kids? Empirical evidence from the Longitudinal Survey of Babies in the 21st Century," Discussion papers 13046, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    7. Robert W. Fairlie & Daniel O. Beltran & Kuntal K. Das, 2010. "HOME COMPUTERS AND EDUCATIONAL OUTCOMES: EVIDENCE FROM THE NLSY97 and CPS-super-," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 48(3), pages 771-792, July.
    8. Samrat Bhattacharya & Abdul Munasib, 2008. "Effect of Television on Child Cognitive Outcome," Economics Working Paper Series 0804, Oklahoma State University, Department of Economics and Legal Studies in Business.
    9. Robert W. Fairlie & Rebecca A. London, 2012. "The Effects of Home Computers on Educational Outcomes: Evidence from a Field Experiment with Community College Students," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 122(561), pages 727-753, June.
    10. Fairlie, Robert W. & Kalil, Ariel, 2017. "The effects of computers on children's social development and school participation: Evidence from a randomized control experiment," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 10-19.
    11. Matthew Gentzkow & Jesse M. Shapiro, 2006. "Does Television Rot Your Brain? New Evidence from the Coleman Study," NBER Working Papers 12021, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Fairlie, Robert W., 2012. "Academic achievement, technology and race: Experimental evidence," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 663-679.
    13. Robert W. Fairlie & Jonathan Robinson, 2013. "Experimental Evidence on the Effects of Home Computers on Academic Achievement among Schoolchildren," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 5(3), pages 211-240, July.
    14. Munasib, Abdul & Bhattacharya, Samrat, 2010. "Is the 'Idiot's Box' raising idiocy? Early and middle childhood television watching and child cognitive outcome," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 873-883, October.

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