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Are cyclical patterns of international housing markets interdependent?

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  • Chang, Kuang-Liang

Abstract

This paper investigates the relationships among the US, UK, and Canadian housing markets from two aspects: the driving forces of housing cycles and the structures of correlation coefficients in different phases of housing cycles. The results indicate that the structures of driving forces and correlation coefficients are deeply hinged on the international housing markets. For the US and Canada pair, the driving forces of cyclical patterns are related to each other and the regime-switching correlation coefficients are always positive. However, for the US and UK pair and the UK and Canada pair, the driving forces are independent and there is no consistent pattern for the correlations.

Suggested Citation

  • Chang, Kuang-Liang, 2020. "Are cyclical patterns of international housing markets interdependent?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 14-24.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:88:y:2020:i:c:p:14-24
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econmod.2019.09.002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Joint housing cycles; Interdependency; Asymmetric correlations;

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • C51 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Construction and Estimation
    • R30 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location - - - General

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