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Environmental effects of remittance of rural–urban migrant

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  • Li, Xiaochun
  • Zhou, Jing

Abstract

In this paper, we investigate the environmental effect of migrant remittance. The rural–urban migration is an important component of migration. Although migrants work and live in the city, the altruistic remittance affects the production scale of urban sector and then exerts impact on the environment. This paper establishes a two-sector general equilibrium model and adopts a comparative static approach to investigate the short-term and long-term impacts of increase in remittance of migrants on the environment. We mainly reach the following conclusions: the increase of migrant remittance can improve the environment in the short term but worsen the environment in the long run.

Suggested Citation

  • Li, Xiaochun & Zhou, Jing, 2015. "Environmental effects of remittance of rural–urban migrant," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 174-179.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:47:y:2015:i:c:p:174-179
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econmod.2015.02.023
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Rural–urban migrants; Remittance; Environment;

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