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Remittances and Income Smoothing

Author

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  • Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes
  • Susan Pozo

Abstract

Due to inadequate savings and binding borrowing constraints, income volatility can make households in developing countries particularly susceptible to economic hardship. We examine the role of remittances in either alleviating or increasing household income volatility using Mexican household level data over the 2000 through 2008 period. We correct for reverse causality and endogeneity and find that while income smoothing does not appear to be the main motive for sending remittances in a non-negligible share of households, remittances do indeed smooth household income on average. Other variables surrounding income volatility are also considered and evaluated.

Suggested Citation

  • Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Susan Pozo, 2011. "Remittances and Income Smoothing," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(3), pages 582-587, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:101:y:2011:i:3:p:582-87
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. HwaJung Choi, 2007. "Are Remittances Insurance? Evidence from Rainfall Shocks in the Philippines," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 21(2), pages 219-248, May.
    2. Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Susan Pozo, 2006. "Remittances as insurance: evidence from Mexican immigrants," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 19(2), pages 227-254, June.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Murard, Elie, 2016. "Consumption and Leisure: The Welfare Impact of Migration on Family Left Behind," IZA Discussion Papers 10305, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Bratti, Massimiliano & Fiore, Simona & Mendola, Mariapia, 2016. "Family Size, Sibling Rivalry and Migration: Evidence from Mexico," IZA Discussion Papers 10462, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Catia Batista & Janis Umblijs, 2016. "Do migrants send remittances as a way of self-insurance?," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 68(1), pages 108-130.
    4. Finkelstein Shapiro, Alan & Mandelman, Federico S., 2016. "Remittances, entrepreneurship, and employment dynamics over the business cycle," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 103(C), pages 184-199.
    5. Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Susan Pozo, 2012. "Remittance Income Volatility and Labor Supply in Mexico," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 79(2), pages 257-276, October.
    6. Flore Gubert, 2014. "The discourse and practice of co-development in Europe," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Migration and Economic Development, chapter 5, pages 113-151 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    7. Kaczmarczyk, Pawel, 2013. "Money for Nothing? Ukrainian Immigrants in Poland and their Remitting Behaviors," IZA Discussion Papers 7666, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. James Dzansi, 2013. "Do remittance inflows promote manufacturing growth?," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 51(1), pages 89-111, August.
    9. Kemper, Niels & Ha, Luu Viet & Klump, Rainer, 2015. "Property Rights and Consumption Volatility: Evidence from a Land Reform in Vietnam," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 107-130.
    10. José Molina, 2014. "Altruism and monetary transfers in the household: inter- and intra-generation issues," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 12(3), pages 407-410, September.
    11. Christian H Ebeke & Boileau Loko & Arina Viseth, 2014. "Credit Quality in Developing Economies; Remittances to the Rescue?," IMF Working Papers 14/144, International Monetary Fund.
    12. Li, Xiaochun & Zhou, Jing, 2015. "Environmental effects of remittance of rural–urban migrant," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 174-179.
    13. Theodore Gerber & Karine Torosyan, 2013. "Remittances in the Republic of Georgia: Correlates, Economic Impact, and Social Capital Formation," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(4), pages 1279-1301, August.
    14. Jaime Lara, 2016. "Remittances as an Insurance Mechanism in the Labor Market," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 37(3), pages 368-387, September.
    15. Bentour, El Mostafa, 2013. "Should Moroccan Officials Depend on the Workers’ Remittances to Finance the Current Account Deficit?," MPRA Paper 52290, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 01 May 2013.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • O54 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Latin America; Caribbean

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