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Habit formation and housing over the life cycle

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  • Aydilek, Asiye

Abstract

We explore the role of habit formation in housing in explaining the life-cycle household allocations. Empirical studies about households in the U.S. reveal that the housing profile increases monotonically until age mid-60s and then flattens out. The model is realistically calibrated and solved numerically under different habit strength parameters. For all values of the parameter, our model produces lower reduction of housing for the elderly compared to the standard model which does not include habit formation. The amount of reduction in housing in the old ages and the level of housing decrease significantly as habit strength increases. The person becomes more attached to his house with a higher habit strength. Considering intolerance towards housing reductions, one consumes a lower amount of housing in the young ages to be able to maintain it in the old ages. These results suggest that in addition to the transaction costs in house trading, habit formation in housing also has a merit in explaining the preservation of housing for elderly people. Our model improves on the literature by investigating the effects of a habit formation behind household allocations and by reducing the role of transaction costs in solving the housing puzzle of the elderly. It contributes to the literature by using a new model with a deep habit preference form and housing. Our model should be preferred to the existing ones since it provides a richer and more real framework for modeling households.

Suggested Citation

  • Aydilek, Asiye, 2013. "Habit formation and housing over the life cycle," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 858-866.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:33:y:2013:i:c:p:858-866
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econmod.2013.05.012
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    Cited by:

    1. Gómez, Manuel A. & Monteiro, Goncalo, 2015. "Internal habits in an endogenous growth model with elastic labor supply," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 583-595.
    2. Aydilek, Asiye, 2016. "The allocation of time and puzzling profiles of the elderly," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 515-526.
    3. Kraft, Holger & Munk, Claus & Wagner, Sebastian, 2015. "Housing habits and their implications for life-cycle consumption and investment," SAFE Working Paper Series 85, Research Center SAFE - Sustainable Architecture for Finance in Europe, Goethe University Frankfurt.
    4. van de Ven, Justin, 2017. "SIDD: An adaptable framework for analysing the distributional implications of policy alternatives where savings and employment decisions matter," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 161-174.
    5. repec:spr:jecfin:v:42:y:2018:i:4:d:10.1007_s12197-018-9433-2 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Housing; Habit; Elderly; Consumption; Wealth;

    JEL classification:

    • C61 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Optimization Techniques; Programming Models; Dynamic Analysis
    • D81 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty
    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making
    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination

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