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Minimum wage, on-the-job search and employment: On the sectoral and aggregate equilibrium effect of the mandatory minimum wage

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  • Gavrel, Frédéric
  • Lebon, Isabelle
  • Rebière, Thérèse

Abstract

We study the impact of a minimum wage in a segmented labor market in which workers are at different stages of their careers. At the end of a learning-by-doing period, workers paid the minimum wage quit “bad jobs” for better-paying “good jobs”, following an on-the-job search process with endogenous search intensity. A rise in the minimum wage reduces “bad jobs” creation and prompts workers to keep their “bad jobs” by reducing on-the-job search intensity. The ambiguous impact on unqualified employment replicates and explains the findings of several empirical studies. However, a minimum wage rise reduces overall employment and output.

Suggested Citation

  • Gavrel, Frédéric & Lebon, Isabelle & Rebière, Thérèse, 2012. "Minimum wage, on-the-job search and employment: On the sectoral and aggregate equilibrium effect of the mandatory minimum wage," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 691-699.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:29:y:2012:i:3:p:691-699
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econmod.2012.01.005
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Frédéric Gavrel, 2015. "Participation, Recruitment Selection, and the Minimum Wage," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 117(4), pages 1281-1305, October.
    2. Pandelis Mitsis, 2015. "Effects of Minimum Wages on Total Employment: Evidence from Cyprus," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 36(3), pages 318-345, September.
    3. Gavrel, Frédéric & Lebon, Isabelle & Rebière, Thérèse, 2010. "Wages, selectivity, and vacancies: Evaluating the short-term and long-term impact of the minimum wage on unemployment," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 1274-1281, September.
    4. Kawata, Keisuke, 2015. "Work hour mismatches and on-the-job search," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 280-291.
    5. Saari, M. Yusof & Rahman, M. Affan Abdul & Hassan, Azman & Habibullah, Muzafar Shah, 2016. "Estimating the impact of minimum wages on poverty across ethnic groups in Malaysia," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 490-502.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Minimum wage; On-the-job search; Search intensity; Unqualified employment;

    JEL classification:

    • J38 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Public Policy
    • J42 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Monopsony; Segmented Labor Markets
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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