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Poverty traps, the money growth rule, and the stage of financial development

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  • Gokan, Yoichi

Abstract

This paper investigates how monetary policy influences the emergence of local indeterminacy, local bifurcations, and multiple steady states, depending upon the degree of the commitment parameter that defines financial market imperfection, using Diamond's overlapping generations model with credit market frictions. The analytical results will show that poverty traps happen as an inevitable outcome under a wider range of money growth rates, because financial markets are less developed. Put differently, we derive analytically the positive link between financial development and per capita income.

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  • Gokan, Yoichi, 2011. "Poverty traps, the money growth rule, and the stage of financial development," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 35(8), pages 1273-1287, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:dyncon:v:35:y:2011:i:8:p:1273-1287
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Valerie R. Bencivenga & Bruce D. Smith, 1991. "Financial Intermediation and Endogenous Growth," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(2), pages 195-209.
    2. Gokan, Yoichi, 2006. "Dynamic effects of government expenditure in a finance constrained economy," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 127(1), pages 323-333, March.
    3. Greenwood, Jeremy & Jovanovic, Boyan, 1990. "Financial Development, Growth, and the Distribution of Income," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(5), pages 1076-1107, October.
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    5. Greenwood, Jeremy & Smith, Bruce D., 1997. "Financial markets in development, and the development of financial markets," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 145-181, January.
    6. Robert G. King & Ross Levine, 1993. "Finance and Growth: Schumpeter Might Be Right," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(3), pages 717-737.
    7. Huybens, Elisabeth & Smith, Bruce D., 1998. "Financial Market Frictions, Monetary Policy, and Capital Accumulation in a Small Open Economy," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 81(2), pages 353-400, August.
    8. Kiminori Matsuyama, 2004. "Financial Market Globalization, Symmetry-Breaking, and Endogenous Inequality of Nations," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 72(3), pages 853-884, May.
    9. Atje, Raymond & Jovanovic, Boyan, 1993. "Stock markets and development," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(2-3), pages 632-640, April.
    10. Hicks, J. R., 1969. "A Theory of Economic History," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198811633.
    11. Bruce D. Smith & John H. Boyd, 1998. "Capital market imperfections in a monetary growth model," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 11(2), pages 241-273.
    12. Gokan, Yoichi, 2008. "Alternative government financing and aggregate fluctuations driven by self-fulfilling expectations," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 32(5), pages 1650-1679, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Takuma Kunieda & Tarishi Matsuoka & Akihisa Shibata, 2017. "Asset Bubbles, Technology Choice, and Financial Crises," Discussion Paper Series 157, School of Economics, Kwansei Gakuin University, revised Feb 2017.
    2. Matsuoka, Tarishi & Shibata, Akihisa, 2012. "Asset bubbles, credit market imperfections, and technology choice," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 116(1), pages 52-55.
    3. Kunieda, Takuma, 2014. "A note on the crowd-in effect of asset bubbles in the perpetual youth model," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 50-54.
    4. Taofeek Olusola Ayinde & Olumuyiwa Ganiyu Yinusa, 2016. "Financial Development and Inclusive Growth in Nigeria: A Threshold Analysis," Acta Universitatis Danubius. OEconomica, Danubius University of Galati, issue 12(4), pages 326-346, October.

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