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Assets and child well-being in developing countries: A research review

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  • Chowa, Gina
  • Ansong, David
  • Masa, Rainier

Abstract

The impact of assets on child well-being in developing countries has received considerable attention in the last decade. Increased recognition of the critical role played by assets in enhancing children's well-being has spurred efforts to study the relationship between assets and a range of outcomes for children. This chapter reviews current studies (i.e., conducted within the past 10Â years) that explore the relationship between asset ownership and a range of outcomes. The studies we have included in this review illustrate the impact that assets can have on children's outcomes in the area of health, education, and child labor. Overall, the studies reviewed show that asset ownership improves children's health conditions, advance schooling outcomes, and decrease incidence of child labor. Further research on the asset effects for child outcomes can inform progressive asset-building initiatives that will provide impetus for programs and policies to enhance household well-being in developing countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Chowa, Gina & Ansong, David & Masa, Rainier, 2010. "Assets and child well-being in developing countries: A research review," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 32(11), pages 1508-1519, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:cysrev:v:32:y:2010:i:11:p:1508-1519
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Gina Chowa & Mathieu Despard, 2014. "The Influence of Parental Financial Socialization on Youth’s Financial Behavior: Evidence from Ghana," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 35(3), pages 376-389, September.
    2. Chowa, Gina A.N. & Masa, Rainier D. & Wretman, Christopher J. & Ansong, David, 2013. "The impact of household possessions on youth's academic achievement in the Ghana Youthsave experiment: A propensity score analysis," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 69-81.
    3. Hamna Ahmed, 2012. "The Impact of Public School Enrolment on Child Labor in Punjab, Pakistan," Lahore Journal of Economics, Department of Economics, The Lahore School of Economics, vol. 17(2), pages 1-34, July-Dec.

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