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Famine, fertility, and fortune in china

  • SHI, Xinzheng

In this paper, I investigate the long term effects of China's Great Famine in 1959-1961 on cohorts affected by the famine in the first year of life. Using China's 2000 population census data and after controlling for positive fertility selections in the famine, I find that women exposed to the famine in the first year of life had a lower probability of completing high school and lived in less wealthy households. I do not find any significant effects of the famine on men. In addition, I find that if positive fertility selections are not controlled for, the negative effects become weaker.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal China Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 22 (2011)
Issue (Month): 2 (June)
Pages: 244-259

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Handle: RePEc:eee:chieco:v:22:y:2011:i:2:p:244-259
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/chieco

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