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Designing effective and efficient incentive policies for renewable energy in generation expansion planning

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  • Zhou, Ying
  • Wang, Lizhi
  • McCalley, James D.

Abstract

We present a bilevel optimization approach to designing effective and efficient incentive policies for stimulating investment in renewable energy. The effectiveness of an incentive policy is its capability to achieve a goal that would not be achievable without it. Renewable portfolio standards are used in this paper as the policy goal. The efficiency of an incentive policy is measured by the amount of policy intervention, such as taxes collected or subsidies paid, to achieve the policy goal. We obtain the most effective and efficient incentive policies in the context of generation expansion planning, in which a centralized planner makes investment decisions for the energy system to serve projected demand of electricity. A case study is conducted on integrated coal transportation and electricity transmission networks representing the contiguous United States. The numerical analysis from the case study provides insights on the comparison of various incentive policies. The sensitivity of the incentive policies with respect to coal production cost, wind energy investment cost, and transmission capacity is also studied.

Suggested Citation

  • Zhou, Ying & Wang, Lizhi & McCalley, James D., 2011. "Designing effective and efficient incentive policies for renewable energy in generation expansion planning," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 88(6), pages 2201-2209, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:appene:v:88:y:2011:i:6:p:2201-2209
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    References listed on IDEAS

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