IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

The effects of natural disasters on farm household income and expenditures: A study on rice farmers in Bangladesh

  • Mottaleb, Khondoker Abdul
  • Mohanty, Samarendu
  • Hoang, Hoa Thi Khanh
  • Rejesus, Roderick M.
Registered author(s):

    Although millions of households in the world depend on rice cultivation for income and employment, volatility in rice income and negative income shocks caused by crop failure stem from natural disasters, an almost regular phenomenon in rice farming in Asia and Africa. Income volatility may force households in developing countries to lower their expenditures on health and education, as the literature suggests. A drastic reduction in education and health expenditures due to negative income shocks can affect children’s health and education, and hence human capital formation in the long run, in developing countries. Using the Household Income and Expenditure Survey (HIES) data from the government of Bangladesh and applying the “difference-in-difference” estimation method in a natural experimental setting, this article reveals that in the face of a loss in income caused by a tropical cyclone that hit the coastal region in May 2009, cyclone-affected rice farmers spent less on their children’s education. This study suggests active intervention to ensure stable income to make schooling expenditures less elastic with rice income to ensure human capital development in agriculture-dependent countries in the long run.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308521X13000735
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Agricultural Systems.

    Volume (Year): 121 (2013)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 43-52

    as
    in new window

    Handle: RePEc:eee:agisys:v:121:y:2013:i:c:p:43-52
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/agsy

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as in new window
    1. Robert Jensen, 2000. "Agricultural Volatility and Investments in Children," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 399-404, May.
    2. Thomas, Duncan & Beegle, Kathleen & Frankenberg, Elizabeth & Sikoki, Bondan & Strauss, John & Teruel, Graciela, 2004. "Education in a crisis," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(1), pages 53-85, June.
    3. Sarker, Md. Abdur Rashid & Alam, Khorshed & Gow, Jeff, 2012. "Exploring the relationship between climate change and rice yield in Bangladesh: An analysis of time series data," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 11-16.
    4. Yasuyuki Sawada & Michael Lokshin, 2007. "Obstacles to School Progression in Rural Pakistan: An Analysis of Gender and Sibling Rivalry Using Field Survey Data," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-484, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
    5. Shahidur R. Khandker, 2007. "Coping with flood: role of institutions in Bangladesh," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 36(2), pages 169-180, 03.
    6. Duryea, Suzanne & Lam, David & Levison, Deborah, 2007. "Effects of economic shocks on children's employment and schooling in Brazil," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(1), pages 188-214, September.
    7. Jacoby, Hanan G & Skoufias, Emmanuel, 1997. "Risk, Financial Markets, and Human Capital in a Developing Country," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(3), pages 311-35, July.
    8. Foster, Andrew D, 1995. "Prices, Credit Markets and Child Growth in Low-Income Rural Areas," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 105(430), pages 551-70, May.
    9. Emla Fitzsimons, 2007. "The Effects of Risk on Education in Indonesia," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 56, pages 1-25.
    10. Ganesh-Kumar, A. & Prasad, Sanjay K. & Pullabhotla, Hemant, 2012. "Supply and Demand for Cereals in Bangladesh: 2010–2030:," IFPRI discussion papers 1186, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    11. Wilson, Clevo & Tisdell, Clement A., 2002. "OLS and Tobit Estimates: When is Substitution Defensible Operationally?," Economic Theory, Applications and Issues Working Papers 90519, University of Queensland, School of Economics.
    12. Ly, Proyuth & Jensen, Lars Stoumann & Bruun, Thilde Bech & Rutz, Dominik & de Neergaard, Andreas, 2012. "The System of Rice Intensification: Adapted practices, reported outcomes and their relevance in Cambodia," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 113(C), pages 16-27.
    13. Skoufias, Emmanuel, 2003. "Economic Crises and Natural Disasters: Coping Strategies and Policy Implications," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(7), pages 1087-1102, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:agisys:v:121:y:2013:i:c:p:43-52. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Zhang, Lei)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.