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Motives to remit: some microeconomic evidence from Pakistan

  • Amar Iqbal Anwar

    ()

    (Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University)

  • Mazhar Yaseen Mughal

    ()

    (Centre dAnalyse et Traitement Th´eorique des Donn´ees)

Using household economic survey data for the years 2005-06 and 2007-08, we examine the economic, demographic and geographical characteristics of remittance receiving households in Pakistan. We find that altruism is the most likely motive behind the remittances sent back by Pakistanis living abroad. However, co-insurance and investment may also have played some role. Gender of the household head, household size, family income and urban/rural setting appear to be the remittances' main determinants, whereas education and family wealth play a minor role.

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Article provided by AccessEcon in its journal Economics Bulletin.

Volume (Year): 32 (2012)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 574-585

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Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-11-00502
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  1. Donald Cox & Zekeriya Eser & Emmanuel Jimenez, 1996. "Motives for Private Transfers over the Life Cycle: An Analytical Framework and Evidence for Peru," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 327., Boston College Department of Economics.
  2. Bugamelli, Matteo & Paternò, Francesco, 2009. "Do Workers' Remittances Reduce the Probability of Current Account Reversals?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 1821-1838, December.
  3. Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Susan Pozo, 2006. "Remittances as insurance: evidence from Mexican immigrants," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 19(2), pages 227-254, June.
  4. Mazhar Y. Mughal, 2013. "Remittances As Development Strategy: Stepping Stones Or Slippery Slope?," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(4), pages 583-595, 05.
  5. Elke Holst & Mechthild Schrooten, 2006. "Migration and Money - What Determines Remittances?: Evidence from Germany," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 566, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
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  7. Banerjee, Biswajit, 1984. "The probability, size and uses of remittances from urban to rural areas in India," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 293-311, December.
  8. Ilahi, Nadeem & Jafarey, Saqib, 1999. "Guestworker migration, remittances and the extended family: evidence from Pakistan," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(2), pages 485-512, April.
  9. Dustmann, Christian & Mestres, Josep, 2010. "Remittances and temporary migration," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(1), pages 62-70, May.
  10. Mazhar Yasin mughal & Farid Makhlouf, 2011. "Volatility of Remittances to Pakistan: What do the Data Tell?," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 31(1), pages 605-612.
  11. Gertrud Schrieder & Beatrice Knerr, 2000. "Labour Migration as a Social Security Mechanism for Smallholder Households in Sub-Saharan Africa: The Case of Cameroon," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(2), pages 223-236.
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