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Cross-temporal universality of non-linear dependencies in Asian stock markets

Author

Listed:
  • Kian-Ping Lim

    () (Labuan School of International Business and Finance, Universiti Malaysia Sabah)

  • Melvin J. Hinich

    () (Applied Research Laboratories, University of Texas at Austin)

Abstract

This study utilizes the Hinich portmanteau bicorrelation test in conjunction with the windowed testing procedure to examine the cross-temporal universality of non-linear dependencies in the returns series for Asian stock market indices. As a whole, the detected non-linear dependencies do not appear to be persistent or stable across time for all the stock markets. In particular, the underlying process is of a switching type, with the pure noise process from time to time switches to a non-linear dependent stochastic process for some unknown length of time, and then switches back to pure-noise. This provides a plausible explanation for the disappointing forecasting performance of many non-linear models, as these existing models do not take note of the episodic transient nature of the non-linear dependency structures.

Suggested Citation

  • Kian-Ping Lim & Melvin J. Hinich, 2005. "Cross-temporal universality of non-linear dependencies in Asian stock markets," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 7(1), pages 1-6.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-04g10005
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Wild, Phillip & Hinich, Melvin J. & Foster, John, 2010. "Are daily and weekly load and spot price dynamics in Australia's National Electricity Market governed by episodic nonlinearity?," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(5), pages 1082-1091, September.
    2. Alexandru Todea & Adrian Zoicas-Ienciu & Angela-Maria Filip, 2009. "Profitability of the Moving Average Strategy and the Episodic Dependencies: Empirical Evidence from European Stock," European Research Studies Journal, European Research Studies Journal, vol. 0(1), pages 63-72.
    3. Henryk Gurgul & Robert Syrek, 2010. "Polish stock market and some foreign markets - dependence analysis by regime-switching copulas," Managerial Economics, AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Management, vol. 8, pages 21-39.
    4. Veli YILANCI, 2012. "Detection Of Nonlinear Events In Turkish Stock Market," Journal of Applied Economic Sciences, Spiru Haret University, Faculty of Financial Management and Accounting Craiova, vol. 7(1(19)/ Sp), pages 93-96.

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    JEL classification:

    • G1 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets

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