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Small Business Clusters in Oklahoma: MAR or Jacobs Effects?


  • Nica, M.


One of the main factors that act as catalysts for small business creation seems to be the existence of business clusters. This study uses both standard and spatial statistics methodologies and tools to analyze the dynamics of small business clusters and the degree to which it is influenced by Marshall-Arrow-Romer or Jacobs effects. The study contributes to better understanding of the influence that industrial diversity or specialization has on the growth of the number of small businesses and, consequently, on small businesses cluster formation. Maybe the most significant finding of this study is that the evidence suggests that Marshall-Arrow-Romer effects are preponderant. Indeed, the study finds significant MAR dynamic effects for the period under scrutiny, as well as Marshall-Arrow-Romer static effects for 2005.

Suggested Citation

  • Nica, M., 2010. "Small Business Clusters in Oklahoma: MAR or Jacobs Effects?," Regional and Sectoral Economic Studies, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 10(2).
  • Handle: RePEc:eaa:eerese:v:10:y2010:i:2_1

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    7. Leo van Wissen, 2004. "A Spatial Interpretation of the Density Dependence Model in Industrial Demography," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 22(3_4), pages 253-264, April.
    8. Catherine Baumont & Cem Ertur & Julie Le Gallo, 2003. "Spatial Analysis Of Employment And Population Density: The Case Of The Agglomeration Of Dijon, 1999," Urban/Regional 0310003, EconWPA.
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    Cited by:

    1. E. G. Popkova & L. S. Shakhovskaya & S. A. Abramov & A. S. Natsubidze, 2016. "Ecological clusters as a tool of improving the environmental safety in developing countries," Environment, Development and Sustainability: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development, Springer, vol. 18(4), pages 1049-1057, August.
    2. Kirill Gerasimov & Nikolai Prosvirkin, 2015. "System of Control of Effectiveness of Enterprise Cooperation in Industrial Cluster," European Research Studies Journal, European Research Studies Journal, vol. 0(3), pages 263-270.
    3. Evgeny V. Frank & Oksana V. Mashevskaya & Lilia V. Ermolina, 2016. "Innovational Mechanism of Implementation of Cluster Initiatives in Business," European Research Studies Journal, European Research Studies Journal, vol. 0(1), pages 179-188.

    More about this item


    SMEs; Spatial Clusters; Economic Agglomerations; Industrial Concentration; US;

    JEL classification:

    • M2 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Economics
    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure
    • R1 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics


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