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Socio-economic inequalities in mortality and health in the developing world


  • FFF1Alberto NNN1Minujin

    (United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF))

  • FFF2Enrique NNN2Delamonica

    (United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF))


Trends in child mortality disparities show that within country inequities have remained constant in some countries and worsened in most of the other ones. Only three countries, with relatively small populations which comprise less than 2 per cent of our sample, were able to achieve both a reduction in disparity and improvements (or no decline) in national average U5MR. The evolution of nutrition and DPT3 immunisation seems more promising.

Suggested Citation

  • FFF1Alberto NNN1Minujin & FFF2Enrique NNN2Delamonica, 2004. "Socio-economic inequalities in mortality and health in the developing world," Demographic Research Special Collections, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 2(13), pages 331-354, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:drspec:v:2:y:2004:i:13

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Deirdre N. McCloskey & Stephen T. Ziliak, 1996. "The Standard Error of Regressions," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 34(1), pages 97-114, March.
    2. Filmer, Deon*Pritchett, Lant, 1998. "Estimating wealth effects without expenditure data - or tears : with an application to educational enrollments in states of India," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1994, The World Bank.
    3. Sahn, David E. & Stifel, David C., 2000. "Poverty Comparisons Over Time and Across Countries in Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(12), pages 2123-2155, December.
    4. Cornia, G.A., 1999. "Liberalization, Globalization and Income Distribution," Research Paper 157, World Institute for Development Economics Research.
    5. Sen, Amartya, 1997. "On Economic Inequality," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198292975, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Rodrigo R. Soares, 2007. "On the Determinants of Mortality Reductions in the Developing World," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 33(2), pages 247-287.
    2. Fred Pampel & Justin Denney, 2011. "Cross-National Sources of Health Inequality: Education and Tobacco Use in the World Health Survey," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 48(2), pages 653-674, May.
    3. Meheus, Filip & Van Doorslaer, Eddy, 2008. "Achieving better measles immunization in developing countries: does higher coverage imply lower inequality?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 66(8), pages 1709-1718, April.
    4. repec:spr:soinre:v:133:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11205-016-1397-z is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item


    developing countries; equity; inequality; socioeconomic trends; socioeconomy; under-five mortality; wealth gap;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General


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