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Social Mobility Barriers for Roma: Discrimination and Informal Institutions

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  • Ciaian, Pavel
  • Kancs, D’artis

Abstract

This article attempts to identify and document social mobility barriers for Roma. We have identified two types of social mobility barriers: the cost of exit from the traditional Roma community, and the cost of entry into the mainstream society. Most of the existing policy and academic debate on the social and economic marginalisation of Roma has focused almost entirely on entry barriers. The main contribution of the current paper to the existing literature is to draw attention to exit barriers, which usually are neglected in the public debate and the academic literature. In the current paper we show that understanding both types of social mobility barriers for Roma is crucial for designing effective policy measures.

Suggested Citation

  • Ciaian, Pavel & Kancs, D’artis, 2018. "Social Mobility Barriers for Roma: Discrimination and Informal Institutions," European Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 26(4), pages 670-685, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:eurrev:v:26:y:2018:i:04:p:670-685_00
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gábor Kertesi & Gábor Kézdi, 2011. "Roma employment in Hungary after the post‐communist transition," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 19(3), pages 563-610, July.
    2. Montgomery, James D, 1991. "Social Networks and Labor-Market Outcomes: Toward an Economic Analysis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(5), pages 1407-1418, December.
    3. Greif, Avner & Laitin, David D., 2004. "A Theory of Endogenous Institutional Change," American Political Science Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 98(4), pages 633-652, November.
    4. Niall O'Higgins & Andrey Ivanov, 2006. "Education and Employment Opportunities for the Roma," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 48(1), pages 6-19, March.
    5. Katalin Halasz, 2009. "The Rise of the Radical Right in Europe and the Case of Hungary: ‘Gypsy crime’ defines national identity?," Development, Palgrave Macmillan;Society for International Deveopment, vol. 52(4), pages 490-494, December.
    6. Masahiko Aoki, 2013. "Endogenizing institutions and institutional changes," Chapters, in: Comparative Institutional Analysis, chapter 16, pages 267-297, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    7. George A. Akerlof & Rachel E. Kranton, 2000. "Economics and Identity," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 115(3), pages 715-753.
    8. Pavel Ciaian & d'Artis Kancs, 2016. "Causes of the Social and Economic Marginalisation: The Role of Social Mobility Barriers for Roma," EERI Research Paper Series EERI RP 2016/03, Economics and Econometrics Research Institute (EERI), Brussels.
    9. Kenneth J. Arrow, 1998. "What Has Economics to Say about Racial Discrimination?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(2), pages 91-100, Spring.
    10. Pavel Ciaian & Andrey Ivanov & d'Artis Kancs, 2019. "Universal basic income: A viable policy alternative?," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 42(10), pages 2975-3000, October.
    11. Phelps, Edmund S, 1972. "The Statistical Theory of Racism and Sexism," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 62(4), pages 659-661, September.
    12. Ciaian, Pavel & Kancs, D’Artis, 2019. "Marginalisation of Roma: Root Causes and Possible Policy Actions," European Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 27(1), pages 115-130, February.
    13. Owen Parker, 2012. "Roma and the Politics of EU Citizenship in France: Everyday Security and Resistance," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(3), pages 475-491, May.
    14. Dena Ringold & Mitchell A. Orenstein & Erika Wilkens, 2005. "Roma in an Expanding Europe : Breaking the Poverty Cycle," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 14869, Juni.
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    1. Ciaian, Pavel & Kancs, D’Artis, 2019. "Marginalisation of Roma: Root Causes and Possible Policy Actions," European Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 27(1), pages 115-130, February.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O17 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Formal and Informal Sectors; Shadow Economy; Institutional Arrangements
    • O43 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Institutions and Growth
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty

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