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Resident vs. Nonresident Employment Associated with Marcellus Shale Development

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  • Wrenn, Douglas H.
  • Kelsey, Timothy W.
  • Jaenicke, Edward C.

Abstract

There is much debate about the employment effect of shale gas development, especially as it relates to extraction counties. Anecdotal evidence suggests that many of the jobs created are filled by nonresidents. We examine the impact shale gas development has on local employment in Pennsylvania using a data set that links workers to their personal residences. We find that activity in the Marcellus shale has had a modest positive impact on job growth. The impact is cut in half, however, when we use data for county residents only. Thus, traditional employment data may overestimate employment impacts from shale development.
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Suggested Citation

  • Wrenn, Douglas H. & Kelsey, Timothy W. & Jaenicke, Edward C., 2015. "Resident vs. Nonresident Employment Associated with Marcellus Shale Development," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 44(02), pages 1-19, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:agrerw:v:44:y:2015:i:02:p:1-19_01
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    Cited by:

    1. Joseph Marchand & Jeremy Weber, 2018. "Local Labor Markets And Natural Resources: A Synthesis Of The Literature," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(2), pages 469-490, April.
    2. Burnett, J. Wesley, 2015. "FOREWORD: Unconventional Oil and Gas Development: Economic, Environmental, and Policy Analysis," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 44(2), pages 1-15, August.
    3. Agerton, Mark & Hartley, Peter R. & Medlock, Kenneth B. & Temzelides, Ted, 2017. "Employment impacts of upstream oil and gas investment in the United States," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 171-180.
    4. Brown, Jason P. & Coupal, Roger & Hitaj, Claudia & Kelsey, Timothy W. & Krannich, Richard S. & Xiarchos, Irene M., 2017. "New Dynamics in Fossil Fuel and Renewable Energy for Rural America," USDA Miscellaneous 260676, United States Department of Agriculture.
    5. Timothy W. Kelsey & Mark D. Partridge & Nancy E. White, 2016. "Unconventional Gas and Oil Development in the United States: Economic Experience and Policy Issues," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 38(2), pages 191-214.
    6. Rickman, Dan S. & Wang, Hongbo & Winters, John V., 2017. "Is shale development drilling holes in the human capital pipeline?," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 283-290.
    7. repec:eee:ecolec:v:138:y:2017:i:c:p:178-185 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. repec:eee:resene:v:55:y:2019:i:c:p:1-23 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Fleming, David & Komarek, Timothy & Partridge, Mark & Measham, Thomas, 2015. "The Booming Socioeconomic Impacts of Shale: A Review of Findings and Methods in the Empirical Literature," MPRA Paper 68487, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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