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Natural Resources and Economic Growth: Some Theory and Evidence

Author

Listed:
  • Dustin Chambers

    (Department of Economics and Finance, Salisbury University)

  • Jang-Ting Guo

    (Department of Economics, 4123 Sproul Hall, University of California)

Abstract

We develop a one-sector endogenous growth model in which renewable natural resources are both a factor of production and measure of environmental quality. Along the balanced growth path, sustained economic growth and a non-deteriorating environment are shown to coexist. Moreover, steady-state economic growth and natural-resource utilization are positively related. Empirically, a cross-country growth regression that includes a broad measure of productive natural resources ¡ª the Ecological Footprint ¡ª provides strong support. Our estimation results also suggest conservation costs are minimal, and growth strategies based on greater physical capital formation and trade openness outperform those relying on more intensive utilization of the environment.

Suggested Citation

  • Dustin Chambers & Jang-Ting Guo, 2009. "Natural Resources and Economic Growth: Some Theory and Evidence," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 10(2), pages 367-389, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:cuf:journl:y:2009:v:10:i:2:p:367-389
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Robinson, James A. & Torvik, Ragnar & Verdier, Thierry, 2006. "Political foundations of the resource curse," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(2), pages 447-468, April.
    2. Winford H. Masanjala & Chris Papageorgiou, 2008. "Rough and lonely road to prosperity: a reexamination of the sources of growth in Africa using Bayesian model averaging," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(5), pages 671-682.
    3. R. M. Solow, 1974. "Intergenerational Equity and Exhaustible Resources," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 41(5), pages 29-45.
    4. Sachs, Jeffrey D. & Warner, Andrew M., 1999. "The big push, natural resource booms and growth," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(1), pages 43-76, June.
    5. Barro, Robert J, 2000. "Inequality and Growth in a Panel of Countries," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 5(1), pages 5-32, March.
    6. Stokey, Nancy L, 1998. "Are There Limits to Growth?," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 39(1), pages 1-31, February.
    7. Gylfason, Thorvaldur, 2001. "Natural resources, education, and economic development," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(4-6), pages 847-859, May.
    8. Manuel Arellano & Stephen Bond, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(2), pages 277-297.
    9. Kristin J. Forbes, 2000. "A Reassessment of the Relationship between Inequality and Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 869-887, September.
    10. Haberl, Helmut & Erb, Karl-Heinz & Krausmann, Fridolin, 2001. "How to calculate and interpret ecological footprints for long periods of time: the case of Austria 1926-1995," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 25-45, July.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Frey, Daniel & Frey, Miriam & Wieslhuber, Carmen, 2013. "Do natural resources define convergence clubs? Empirical evidence from the Kazakh regions," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 404-414.
    2. Addison,Tony & Boly,Amadou & Mveyange,Anthony Francis, 2016. "Mining and economic development : did China's WTO accession affect African local economic development ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7906, The World Bank.
    3. Dustin Chambers & Susan Hamer, 2012. "Culture And Growth: Some Empirical Evidence," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(4), pages 549-564, October.
    4. Wang, Chan, 2012. "A very preliminary survey on growth and development," MPRA Paper 39037, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Natural resources; Endogenous growth; Ecological footprint;

    JEL classification:

    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models
    • Q21 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth

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