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Presidential Address: Innovation in retrospect and prospect


  • James A. Brander


This paper asks whether innovation has slowed in recent decades. While there has been dramatic progress in information and communications technology, the recent record of innovation in the crucially important agriculture, energy, transportation, and health care sectors is cause for concern. The paper also considers whether the pace of innovation is sufficient to improve or even maintain living standards in the face of still rapidly growing population, global warming, and other challenges. I review the major market failures that lead to under-provision of innovation and question whether current innovation policy, particularly patent policy, is effective in promoting innovation.

Suggested Citation

  • James A. Brander, 2010. "Presidential Address: Innovation in retrospect and prospect," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 43(4), pages 1087-1121, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:cje:issued:v:43:y:2010:i:4:p:1087-1121

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Blanchard, Olivier Jean & Quah, Danny, 1989. "The Dynamic Effects of Aggregate Demand and Supply Disturbances," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(4), pages 655-673, September.
    2. Pierre L. Siklos, 1999. "Inflation-target design: changing inflation performance and persistence in industrial countries," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Mar, pages 46-58.
    3. Nelson C. Mark, 2009. "Changing Monetary Policy Rules, Learning, and Real Exchange Rate Dynamics," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 41(6), pages 1047-1070, September.
    4. Sharon Kozicki & Peter A. Tinsley, 2005. "Perhaps the FOMC did what it said it did : an alternative interpretation of the Great Inflation," Research Working Paper RWP 05-04, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.
    5. James E. Pesando, 1975. "The Impact of the Conversion Loan on the Term Structure of Interest Rates in Canada: Some Additional Evidence," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 8(2), pages 281-288, May.
    6. Kydland, Finn E & Prescott, Edward C, 1977. "Rules Rather Than Discretion: The Inconsistency of Optimal Plans," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 85(3), pages 473-491, June.
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    JEL classification:

    • O3 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation


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