IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/cje/issued/v23y1990i2p253-75.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Disaggregate Analysis of the Demand for Gasoline

Author

Listed:
  • Michael K. Berkowitz
  • Nancy Gallini
  • Eric Miller
  • Rob Wolfe

Abstract

In this paper, we adopt a disaggregate approach to modeling the components of gasoline demand. Gasoline demand in our model is viewed as the outcome of the following household decisions: vehicle holdings (number and type) and vehicle usage (nondiscretionary and discretionary usage). Modeling gasoline demand in this way correctly specifies gasoline as an input into the production of transportation services and allows for the interdependence between household decisions on vehicle holdings and usage. Moreover, estimation of the components of gasoline demand allows policymakers to identify the means by which individuals will respond to policy changes. This leads to more effective policies designed to reduce gasoline consumption. We use this model to estimate price and fuel efficiency elasticities of vehicle usage and gasoline demand.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael K. Berkowitz & Nancy Gallini & Eric Miller & Rob Wolfe, 1990. "Disaggregate Analysis of the Demand for Gasoline," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 23(2), pages 253-275, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:cje:issued:v:23:y:1990:i:2:p:253-75
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0008-4085%28199005%2923%3A2%3C253%3ADAOTDF%3E2.0.CO%3B2-2
    Download Restriction: only available to JSTOR subscribers

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:resene:v:50:y:2017:i:c:p:74-90 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. de Freitas, Luciano Charlita & Kaneko, Shinji, 2011. "Ethanol demand under the flex-fuel technology regime in Brazil," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 1146-1154.
    3. Javier Asensio & Anna Matas & José Luis Raymond, 2001. "Petrol consumption and redistributive effects of its taxation in Spain," Working Papers wp0109, Department of Applied Economics at Universitat Autonoma of Barcelona.
    4. Nagy Eltony, M., 1996. "Demand for gasoline in the GCC: an application of pooling and testing procedures," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 203-209, July.
    5. John Eakins, 2013. "The Determinants of Household Car Ownership: Empirical Evidence from the Irish Household Budget Survey," Surrey Energy Economics Centre (SEEC), School of Economics Discussion Papers (SEEDS) 144, Surrey Energy Economics Centre (SEEC), School of Economics, University of Surrey.
    6. Nolan, Anne, 2010. "A dynamic analysis of household car ownership," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 44(6), pages 446-455, July.
    7. Eltony, M. N. & Al-Mutairi, N. H., 1995. "Demand for gasoline in Kuwait : An empirical analysis using cointegration techniques," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 249-253, July.
    8. Asensio, Javier & Matas, Anna & Raymond, Jose-Luis, 2003. "Petrol expenditure and redistributive effects of its taxation in Spain," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 49-69, January.
    9. De Borger, Bruno & Mulalic, Ismir & Rouwendal, Jan, 2016. "Substitution between cars within the household," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 135-156.
    10. Bureau, Benjamin, 2011. "Distributional effects of a carbon tax on car fuels in France," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 121-130, January.
    11. Philippe Barla & Bernard Lamonde & Luis Miranda-Moreno & Nathalie Boucher, 2009. "Traveled distance, stock and fuel efficiency of private vehicles in Canada: price elasticities and rebound effect," Transportation, Springer, vol. 36(4), pages 389-402, July.
    12. West, Sarah E., 2004. "Distributional effects of alternative vehicle pollution control policies," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(3-4), pages 735-757, March.
    13. Thomas S. Dee & William N. Evans, 2001. "Teens and Traffic Safety," NBER Chapters,in: Risky Behavior among Youths: An Economic Analysis, pages 121-166 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Michaelis, Laurie & Davidson, Ogunlade, 1996. "GHG mitigation in the transport sector," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(10-11), pages 969-984.
    15. Tenkorang, Frank & Dority, Bree L. & Bridges, Deborah & Lam, Eddery, 2015. "Relationship between ethanol and gasoline: AIDS approach," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 63-69.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cje:issued:v:23:y:1990:i:2:p:253-75. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Prof. Werner Antweiler). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/ceaaaea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.