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Tendances de long terme des migrations internationales : analyse à partir des six principaux pays receveurs

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  • Cécily Defoort

Abstract

This article proposes an estimation of international migration to the six main receiving countries of the OECD between 1975 and 2000. The analysis reveals a large increase in international migration during this period, together with a substantial change in migrant skills. In parallel with this phenomenon we note a significant rise in skill levels at world level. An analysis by country shows a high degree of stability in the list of the countries most affected by the brain drain. While overall change in the migration of skills is limited, the list of countries with the largest losses of highly skilled workers in 1975 is largely unchanged twenty-five years later.

Suggested Citation

  • Cécily Defoort, 2008. "Tendances de long terme des migrations internationales : analyse à partir des six principaux pays receveurs," Population (french edition), Institut National d'Études Démographiques (INED), vol. 63(2), pages 317-351.
  • Handle: RePEc:cai:popine:popu_802_0317
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. John Gibson & David McKenzie, 2011. "Eight Questions about Brain Drain," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 25(3), pages 107-128, Summer.
    2. Marco Delogu & Frédéric Docquier & Joël Machado, 2018. "Globalizing labor and the world economy: the role of human capital," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 23(2), pages 223-258, June.
    3. Thierry Baudassé & Rémi Bazillier, 2010. "Migration and Trade Union Rights," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 146(IV), pages 677-707, December.
    4. Frédéric Docquier & Joël Machado & Khalid Sekkat, 2015. "Efficiency Gains from Liberalizing Labor Mobility," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 117(2), pages 303-346, April.
    5. Andrew Mountford & Hillel Rapoport, 2016. "Migration Policy, African Population Growth and Global Inequality," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 39(4), pages 543-556, April.
    6. Vladimir Borgy & Xavier Chojnicki & Gilles Le Garrec & Cyrille Schwellnus, 2010. "Macroeconomic Consequences of Global Endogenous Migration: a General Equilibrium Analysis," Annals of Economics and Statistics, GENES, issue 97-98, pages 13-39.
    7. Marco DELOGU & Frédéric DOCQUIER & Joël MACHADO, 2013. "The dynamic implications of liberalizing global migration," LIDAM Discussion Papers IRES 2013029, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    8. Frédéric Docquier & Hillel Rapoport, 2012. "Globalization, Brain Drain, and Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 50(3), pages 681-730, September.
    9. Andrea Caragliu & Peter Nijkamp, 2013. "From Islands to Hubs of Innovation: Connecting Innovative Regions," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 13-141/VIII, Tinbergen Institute.
    10. Simone Bertoli & Hillel Rapoport, 2015. "Heaven's Swing Door: Endogenous Skills, Migration Networks, and the Effectiveness of Quality-Selective Immigration Policies," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 117(2), pages 565-591, April.
    11. Gamso, Jonas & Yuldashev, Farhod, 2018. "Does rural development aid reduce international migration?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 268-282.

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