IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

Intraday and Interday Basis Dynamics: Evidence from the FTSE 100 Index Futures Market


  • Garrett Ian

    (University of Manchester)

  • Taylor Nicholas

    (Cardiff University)


We examine the intraday and interday dynamics of both the level of and changes in the FTSE (Financial Times-Stock Exchange) 100 index futures mispricing. Like numerous previous studies we find significant evidence of mean reversion and hence predictability in mispricing changes measured over high (minute-by-minute) and low (daily) frequencies. Contrary to other studies we show explicitly that for high-frequency data, this predictability is due not to microstructure effects but to arbitrage activity. Using a threshold autoregressive model that is consistent with arbitrage behavior, we show that such models imply first-order autocorrelation in mispricing changes similar in magnitude to that actually observed. For low-frequency data, we show that predictability is driven neither by arbitrage activity nor by microstructure effects. Rather, it is a statistical illusion that is the result of overdifferencing a trend-stationary series.

Suggested Citation

  • Garrett Ian & Taylor Nicholas, 2001. "Intraday and Interday Basis Dynamics: Evidence from the FTSE 100 Index Futures Market," Studies in Nonlinear Dynamics & Econometrics, De Gruyter, vol. 5(2), pages 1-22, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:sndecm:v:5:y:2001:i:2:n:3

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: For access to full text, subscription to the journal or payment for the individual article is required.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Taylor, Nick & Dijk, Dick van & Franses, Philip Hans & Lucas, Andre, 2000. "SETS, arbitrage activity, and stock price dynamics," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 24(8), pages 1289-1306, August.
    2. Pradeep K. Yadav & Peter F. Pope, 1990. "Stock index futures arbitrage: International evidence," Journal of Futures Markets, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 10(6), pages 573-603, December.
    3. Martin Martens & Paul Kofman & Ton C. F. Vorst, 1998. "A threshold error-correction model for intraday futures and index returns," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(3), pages 245-263.
    4. Dwyer, Gerald P, Jr & Locke, Peter R & Yu, Wei, 1996. "Index Arbitrage and Nonlinear Dynamics between the S&P 500 Futures and Cash," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 9(1), pages 301-332.
    5. Hansen, Bruce E, 1999. " Testing for Linearity," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 13(5), pages 551-576, December.
    6. A. Abhyankar & L. S. Copeland & W. Wong, 1999. "LIFFE cycles: intraday evidence from the FTSE-100 Stock Index futures market," The European Journal of Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(2), pages 123-139.
    7. Stoll, Hans R. & Whaley, Robert E., 1990. "The Dynamics of Stock Index and Stock Index Futures Returns," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 25(04), pages 441-468, December.
    8. Leybourne, S J, 1995. "Testing for Unit Roots Using Forward and Reverse Dickey-Fuller Regressions," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 57(4), pages 559-571, November.
    9. Dimson, Elroy, 1979. "Risk measurement when shares are subject to infrequent trading," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 197-226, June.
    10. Anderson, Heather M, 1997. "Transaction Costs and Non-linear Adjustment towards Equilibrium in the US Treasury Bill Market," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 59(4), pages 465-484, November.
    11. Lo, Andrew W. & Craig MacKinlay, A., 1990. "An econometric analysis of nonsynchronous trading," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 45(1-2), pages 181-211.
    12. Bruce E. Hansen, 2000. "Sample Splitting and Threshold Estimation," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 68(3), pages 575-604, May.
    13. Neal, Robert, 1996. "Direct Tests of Index Arbitrage Models," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 31(04), pages 541-562, December.
    14. Roll, Richard, 1984. " A Simple Implicit Measure of the Effective Bid-Ask Spread in an Efficient Market," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 39(4), pages 1127-1139, September.
    15. Cohen, Kalman J, et al, 1978. "The Returns Generation Process, Returns Variance, and the Effect of Thinness in Securities Markets," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 33(1), pages 149-167, March.
    16. Brennan, Michael J & Schwartz, Eduardo S, 1990. "Arbitrage in Stock Index Futures," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 63(1), pages 7-31, January.
    17. Yiuman Tse, 1999. "Market microstructure of FT‐SE 100 index futures: An intraday empirical analysis," Journal of Futures Markets, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(1), pages 31-58, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Canto, Bea & Kräussl, Roman, 2007. "Electronic trading systems and intraday non-linear dynamics: An examination of the FTSE 100 cash and futures returns," CFS Working Paper Series 2007/20, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
    2. Taylor, Nicholas, 2004. "Trading intensity, volatility, and arbitrage activity," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 28(5), pages 1137-1162, May.
    3. Michael Graham & Jarno Kiviaho & Jussi Nikkinen, 2013. "Short-term and long-term dependencies of the S&P 500 index and commodity prices," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(4), pages 583-592, March.

    More about this item


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bpj:sndecm:v:5:y:2001:i:2:n:3. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Peter Golla). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.