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The Monetary Transmission Mechanism in Egypt

  • Al-Mashat Rania

    (Central Bank of Egypt)

  • Billmeier Andreas

    (International Monetary Fund)

This paper examines the monetary transmission mechanism in Egypt against the background of the central bank's intention to shift to inflation targeting. It first describes the changing transmission channels over the last decade. Second, the channels are evaluated in a VAR model. The exchange rate channel plays a strong role in propagating monetary shocks to output and prices. Most other channels (bank lending, asset price) are rather weak. The interest rate channel is underdeveloped but appears to be strengthening since the introduction of the interest corridor in 2005, which bodes well for adopting inflation targeting over the medium term.

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Article provided by De Gruyter in its journal Review of Middle East Economics and Finance.

Volume (Year): 4 (2008)
Issue (Month): 3 (September)
Pages: 32-82

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Handle: RePEc:bpj:rmeecf:v:4:y:2008:i:3:n:2
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  1. Lawrence J. Christiano & Martin Eichenbaum, 1992. "Liquidity effects and the monetary transmission mechanism," Staff Report 150, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  2. Peter J. Montiel, 1991. "The Transmission Mechanism for Monetary Policy in Developing Countries," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 38(1), pages 83-108, March.
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  6. Katerina Arnostova & Jaromir Hurnik, 2005. "The Monetary Transmission Mechanism in the Czech Republic (evidence from VAR analysis)," Working Papers 2005/04, Czech National Bank, Research Department.
  7. Ben S. Bernanke & Alan S. Blinder, 1989. "The federal funds rate and the channels of monetary transmission," Working Papers 89-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
  8. Balazs Egert & Ronald MacDonald, 2006. "Monetary Transmission Mechanism in Transition Economies: Surveying the Surveyable," CESifo Working Paper Series 1739, CESifo Group Munich.
  9. Maurice Obstfeld & Jay C.Shambaugh & Alan M.Taylor, 2003. "The Trilemma in History:Tradeoffs among Exchange Rates, Monetary Policies,and Capital Mobility," DNB Staff Reports (discontinued) 94, Netherlands Central Bank.
  10. Frederic S. Mishkin, 1995. "Symposium on the Monetary Transmission Mechanism," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(4), pages 3-10, Fall.
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  12. International Monetary Fund, 2007. "Modalities of Moving to Inflation Targeting in Armenia and Georgia," IMF Working Papers 07/133, International Monetary Fund.
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  14. Strongin, Steven, 1995. "The identification of monetary policy disturbances explaining the liquidity puzzle," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 463-497, June.
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