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Financial Market Integration and Macroeconomic Volatility in the MENA Region: An Empirical Investigation

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  • Neaime Simon

    (Department of Economics, Institute of Financial Economics, American University of Beirut)

Abstract

Using panel data regression models this study examines empirically the impact of regional and international financial integration on macroeconomic volatility in the developing economies of the MENA region over the period 1980–2002. Our empirical results indicate that financial openness is associated with an increase in consumption volatility, contrary to the notions of improved international risk-sharing opportunities through financial integration. Our empirical findings emphasize the role of sound fiscal and monetary policies in driving macroeconomic volatility. In regard to structural reforms, the development of the domestic financial sector is critical, as a high degree of financial sector development is significantly associated with lower macroeconomic volatility. We argue that enhancing regional financial integration might constitute a venue to circumvent the vulnerability of the small open MENA economies to external shocks, and a mean to enhance consumption smoothing opportunities, as well as international financial integration.

Suggested Citation

  • Neaime Simon, 2005. "Financial Market Integration and Macroeconomic Volatility in the MENA Region: An Empirical Investigation," Review of Middle East Economics and Finance, De Gruyter, vol. 3(3), pages 59-83, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:rmeecf:v:3:y:2005:i:3:n:5
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jamaani, Fouad & Roca, Eduardo, 2015. "Are the regional Gulf stock markets weak-form efficient as single stock markets and as a regional stock market?," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 221-246.
    2. Emilio Espino & Julian Kozlowski & Juan M. Sánchez, 2013. "Regionalization vs. globalization," Working Papers 2013-002, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    3. Hideaki Hirata & M. Ayhan Kose & Chris Otrok, "undated". "Regionalization vs. Globalization," Working Paper 164456, Harvard University OpenScholar.
    4. Mohamed Arouri & Christophe Rault, 2010. "Oil Prices and Stock Markets: What Drives What in the Gulf Corporation Council Countries," International Economics, CEPII research center, issue 122, pages 41-56.
    5. Neaime, Simon & Gaysset, Isabelle, 2017. "Sustainability of macroeconomic policies in selected MENA countries: Post financial and debt crises," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 129-140.
    6. Maghyereh, Aktham I. & Awartani, Basel & Hilu, Khalil Al, 2015. "Dynamic transmissions between the U.S. and equity markets in the MENA countries: New evidence from pre- and post-global financial crisis," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 123-138.
    7. Mohamed El Hédi Arouri & Christophe Rault, 2010. "Les effets des fluctuations du prix du pétrole sur les marchés boursiers dans les pays du Golfe," Revue économique, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 61(5), pages 945-959.
    8. Mohamed El hedi Arouri & Christophe Rault, 2009. "On the Influence of Oil Prices on Stock Markets: Evidence from Panel Analysis in GCC Countries," CESifo Working Paper Series 2690, CESifo Group Munich.
    9. Mohamed El Hedi Arouri, 2010. "Time-varying characteristics of cross-market linkages with empirical application to Gulf stock markets," Managerial Finance, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 36(1), pages 57-70, February.
    10. Boako, Gideon & Alagidede, Paul, 2016. "African stock markets convergence: Regional and global analysis," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 18(C), pages 317-321.
    11. El-Masry, Ahmed A. & de Mingo-López, Diego Víctor & Matallín-Sáez, Juan Carlos & Tortosa-Ausina, Emili, 2016. "Environmental conditions, fund characteristics, and Islamic orientation: An analysis of mutual fund performance for the MENA region," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 132(S), pages 174-197.
    12. Ahmed El-Masry & Dalia El-Mosallamy & Juan Carlos Matallín-Sáez & Emili Tortosa-Ausina, 2015. "Mutual Fund Performance in MENA Countries: Environmental Conditions and Fund Characteristics," Working Papers 2015/02, Economics Department, Universitat Jaume I, Castellón (Spain).
    13. Ben Naceur, Samy & Ghazouani, Samir & Omran, Mohammed, 2008. "Does stock market liberalization spur financial and economic development in the MENA region?," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 673-693, December.

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