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Do Charitable Subsidies Crowd Out Political Giving? The Missing Link between Charitable and Political Contributions

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  • Yörük Bariş K.

    (Department of Economics, University at Albany-SUNY, 1400 Washington Ave., Albany, NY 12222, USA)

Abstract

In the United States, charitable contributions can be deducted from taxable income making the price of giving inversely related to the marginal tax rate. However, several other types of contributions such as donations to political organizations are not tax deductible. This paper investigates the spillover effects of charitable subsidies on political giving using five cross-sectional surveys of charitable and political giving in the United States conducted from 1990 to 2001. The results show that charitable and political giving are complements. Compared with non-donors, charitable donors are more likely to donate and give more to political organizations. Increasing the price of charitable giving decreases not only charitable giving but also the probability of giving and the amount of donations to political organizations. This effect is robust under different specifications and highlights the externalities created by charitable subsidies.

Suggested Citation

  • Yörük Bariş K., 2015. "Do Charitable Subsidies Crowd Out Political Giving? The Missing Link between Charitable and Political Contributions," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 15(1), pages 1-29, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejeap:v:15:y:2015:i:1:p:29:n:1
    DOI: 10.1515/bejeap-2012-0026
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