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The Effect of Global Shocks and Volatility on Herd Behavior in Borsa Istanbul

  • Mehmet Balcilar
  • Riza Demirer

This paper contributes to the literature on the financial integration in international stock markets by examining the dynamic relationship between global factors and herd behavior in an emerging market. Utilizing a time-varying transition probability Markov Switching model (TVTP-MS), we examine the role of global risk factors on investor behavior in Borsa Istanbul, dominated largely by foreign investors who hold a substantial share of the stocks traded in this market. Our tests yield three distinct market regimes-low, high, and extreme volatility- and evidence consistent with herd behavior during both the high and extreme volatility regimes. U.S. market related factors are found to dominate regime transitions and thus significantly contribute to herd behavior in all market sectors with the exception of industrials, suggesting that industrials are relatively immune from global shocks. Policy and portfolio implications are discussed next.

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Article provided by Research and Business Development Department, Borsa Istanbul in its journal BIFEC Book of Abstracts & Proceedings.

Volume (Year): 1 (2014)
Issue (Month): 2 (March)
Pages: 142-172

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Handle: RePEc:bor:bifeca:v:1:y:2014:i:2:p:142-172
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Web page: http://www.borsaistanbul.comEmail:


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