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Influences on household spending: evidence from the 2012 NMG Consulting survey

Author

Listed:
  • Bunn, Philip

    () (Bank of England)

  • Le Roux, Jeanne

    () (Bank of England)

  • Johnson, Robert

    () (Bank of England)

  • McLeay, Michael

    () (Bank of England)

Abstract

A number of factors are likely to have restrained household spending growth over the recent past, including weak income growth, tight credit conditions, concerns about debt levels, the fiscal consolidation and uncertainty about future incomes. This article examines the factors affecting spending and saving decisions using the latest survey of households carried out for the Bank of England by NMG Consulting. Real incomes have been squeezed. Concerns about debt levels and tight credit conditions appear to be important factors supporting saving. But many households are also uncertain about their future incomes and have been affected by the fiscal consolidation. Over the next year, households do not expect to change the amount they save significantly, with the same factors that have supported saving recently continuing to be important.

Suggested Citation

  • Bunn, Philip & Le Roux, Jeanne & Johnson, Robert & McLeay, Michael, 2012. "Influences on household spending: evidence from the 2012 NMG Consulting survey," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 52(4), pages 332-342.
  • Handle: RePEc:boe:qbullt:0090
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Nielsen, Mette & Pezzini, Silvia & Reinold, Kate & Williams, Richard, 2010. "The financial position of British households: evidence from the 2010 NMG Consulting survey," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 50(4), pages 333-345.
    2. Bell, Venetia & Young, Garry, 2010. "Understanding the weakness of bank lending," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 50(4), pages 311-320.
    3. Kamath, Kishore & Reinold, Kate & Nielsen, Mette & Radia, Amar, 2011. "The financial position of British households: evidence from the 2011 NMG Consulting survey," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 51(4), pages 305-318.
    4. Churm, Rohan & Radia, Amar & Leake, Jeremy & Srinivasan, Sylaja & Whisker, Rishard, 2012. "The Funding for Lending Scheme," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 52(4), pages 306-320.
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    1. Bunn, Philip & Rostom, May & Domit, Silvia & Worrow, Nicola & Piscitelli, Laura, 2013. "The financial position of British households: evidence from the 2013 NMG Consulting survey," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 53(4), pages 351-360.
    2. Anderson, Gareth & Bunn, Philip & Pugh, Alice & Uluc, Arzu, 2014. "The potential impact of higher interest rates on the household sector: evidence from the 2014 NMG Consulting survey," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 54(4), pages 419-433.

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