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A Comparative Analysis Of The Synchronisation Of Business Cycles For Developed And Developing Economies With The World Business Cycle

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  • Ilse Botha

Abstract

Globalisation brought about worldwide changes, including economic and financial integration between countries. The objective of this paper is to establish if there is synchronisation between developed and developing countries with the world cycle. Research results show that business cycles have become less volatile after globalisation, but there is not much consensus on whether business cycles have become less or more synchronised since globalisation. Little research has been done on co-movement between emerging markets, such as South Africa, and the world business cycle. This paper derives common factors for developed and developing countries by applying principal component analysis (PCA) to output, consumption and investment data, which represents the countries' business cycles. The empirical analysis shows co-movement between some countries and the world business cycle (G7 countries as proxy). The results suggest that there are idiosyncratic and globally common shocks, which play different roles over time in different countries. The paper goes on to suggest that there are clear differences in how developed and emerging markets co-move with the world business cycle. A key finding is that the co-movement between developing economies and the world business cycle has increased since globalisation. This research also confirms previous research that most economies follow the world business cycle when large shocks - such as the recent economic downturn - occur. This has implications for forecasting the business cycle, especially in times of economic turmoil. Copyright (c) 2010 The Author. Journal compilation (c) 2010 Economic Society of South Africa.

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  • Ilse Botha, 2010. "A Comparative Analysis Of The Synchronisation Of Business Cycles For Developed And Developing Economies With The World Business Cycle," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 78(2), pages 192-207, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:sajeco:v:78:y:2010:i:2:p:192-207
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