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Globalization, Wage Volatility, and the Welfare of Workers

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  • Daniel A. Traca

Abstract

This paper analyzes the effects of trade liberalization on the level and volatility of factor returns, in a model with identical technologies across industries and industry-specific uncertainty. The results show an increase in the return to capital and, under certain conditions, a decline in the real wages and welfare of workers, along with an expansion of wage dispersion and volatility. Unlike the Solper-Samuelson mechanism, our results do not depend on the factor intensity of imports and exports and are borne out by all patterns of trade, including among industrialized countries, suggesting that the traditional analysis has missed some important linkages between trade and wages. Copyright Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2005..

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  • Daniel A. Traca, 2005. "Globalization, Wage Volatility, and the Welfare of Workers," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 13(2), pages 237-249, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:reviec:v:13:y:2005:i:2:p:237-249
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    1. Dani Rodrik, 1997. "Has Globalization Gone Too Far?," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 57.
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    Cited by:

    1. Frédérique Bec, 2002. "Mondialisation, mobilité du capital et volatilité macro-économique," Économie et Prévision, Programme National Persée, vol. 152(1), pages 29-53.
    2. Karabay, Bilgehan & McLaren, John, 2010. "Trade, offshoring, and the invisible handshake," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(1), pages 26-34, September.
    3. Svaleryd, Helena & Vlachos, Jonas, 2000. "Does Financial Development Lead to Trade Liberalization?," Research Papers in Economics 2000:11, Stockholm University, Department of Economics.
    4. Svaleryd, Helena & Vlachos, Jonas, 2002. "Markets for risk and openness to trade: how are they related?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(2), pages 369-395, August.
    5. Damien Gaumont & Charbel Macdissi, 2012. "International Migration And Uncertainty:A Non-Factor Price Equalization Overlapping Generations Model," Brussels Economic Review, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles, vol. 55(2), pages 151-177.

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