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The Influence of Fannie and Freddie on Mortgage Loan Terms

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  • Alex Kaufman

Abstract

type="main"> This article uses a novel instrumental variables approach to quantify the effect that government-sponsored enterprise (GSE) purchase eligibility had on equilibrium mortgage loan terms in the period from 2003 to 2007. The technique is designed to eliminate sources of bias that may have affected previous studies. GSE eligibility appears to have lowered interest rates by about ten basis points, encouraged fixed-rate loans over ARMs and discouraged low documentation and brokered loans. There is no measurable effect on loan performance or on the prevalence of certain types of “exotic” mortgages. The overall picture suggests that GSE purchases had only a modest impact on loan terms during this period.

Suggested Citation

  • Alex Kaufman, 2014. "The Influence of Fannie and Freddie on Mortgage Loan Terms," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 42(2), pages 472-496, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:reesec:v:42:y:2014:i:2:p:472-496
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/1540-6229.12030
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Lei Ding & Leonard Nakamura, 2016. "The Impact of the Home Valuation Code of Conduct on Appraisal and Mortgage Outcomes," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 44(3), pages 658-690, July.
    2. W. Scott Frame & Andreas Fuster & Joseph Tracy & James Vickery, 2015. "The Rescue of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 29(2), pages 25-52, Spring.
    3. Agata M. Lozinskaia & Evgeniy M. Ozhegov & Alexander M. Karminsky, 2016. "Discontinuity in Relative Credit Losses: Evidence from Defaults on Government-Insured Residential Mortgages," HSE Working papers WP BRP 55/FE/2016, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    4. Zhao, Yunhui, 2016. "Got Hurt for What You Paid? Revisiting Government Subsidy in the U.S. Mortgage Market," MPRA Paper 81083, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 01 Aug 2017.
    5. Olsen, Edgar O. & Zabel, Jeffrey E., 2015. "US Housing Policy," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, Elsevier.

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