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Technology Gap Matters on Spillover


  • Naotaka Sawada


This paper develops an oligopoly model with endogenous technology spillovers through foreign direct investment (FDI). The foreign entrant brings a superior technology and therefore may spend resources to prevent spillovers of its technology to the home firm. The home firm has an incentive to spend resources to gain these spillovers. After firms strategically choose their expenditures to influence technology spillovers, they compete in a Cournot-Nash quantity game. This study provides theoretical insight on the positive and negative empirical spillover results of FDI on productivity of local firms. Up to a critical bound, the larger the initial technology gap between the foreign and home firms, the more the home firm spends to gain spillovers. Past that boundary, the home firm decreases spending. As a result, the home firm's profits from spillovers vary, but larger technology gaps engender greater net profit losses from FDI. Copyright © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Naotaka Sawada, 2010. "Technology Gap Matters on Spillover," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 14(1), pages 103-120, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:rdevec:v:14:y:2010:i:1:p:103-120

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:eee:iburev:v:26:y:2017:i:5:p:839-854 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Rosanna Pittiglio & Filippo Reganati & Edgardo Sica, 2015. "Do Multinational Enterprises Push up the Wages of Domestic Firms in the Italian Manufacturing Sector?," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 83(3), pages 346-378, June.
    3. Syeda Tamkeen Fatima, 2016. "Productivity spillovers from foreign direct investment: evidence from Turkish micro-level data," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(3), pages 291-324, June.
    4. He, Yong, 2013. "Does China's trade expansion help African development? — an empirical estimation," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 28-38.
    5. repec:voj:journl:v:63:y:2016:i:3:p:313-323 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Latzer, Hélène, 2013. "Bridging the technology gap with limited human capital resources," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 175-184.

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