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Aging And Saving In Asia

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  • Charles Yuji Horioka

Abstract

In this paper, I analyse the impact of population aging on saving in Asia (with emphasis on Japan and China) and obtain the following findings: population aging will lead to declines in household, private, government and national saving rates, but to the extent that population aging is accompanied by absolute declines in population, investment rates will also decline. Moreover, countries always have the option of borrowing from abroad because all countries, even within the Asian region, will presumably not show simultaneous declines in saving. Therefore, the decline in saving caused by population aging will not necessarily spell disaster. Copyright 2010 The Author. Journal compilation 2010 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

Suggested Citation

  • Charles Yuji Horioka, 2010. "Aging And Saving In Asia," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(1), pages 46-55, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:pacecr:v:15:y:2010:i:1:p:46-55
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Steven Lugauer & Nelson Mark, 2010. "Demographic Patterns and Household Saving in China," Working Papers 007, University of Notre Dame, Department of Economics, revised Jun 2012.
    2. Chadwick C. Curtis & Steven Lugauer & Nelson C. Mark, 2015. "Demographic Patterns and Household Saving in China," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, pages 58-94.
    3. Jane Golley & Rod Tyers, 2012. "Demographic Dividends, Dependencies, and Economic Growth in China and India," Asian Economic Papers, MIT Press, pages 1-26.
    4. Jane Golley & Rod Tyers, 2012. "Demographic Dividends, Dependencies, and Economic Growth in China and India," Asian Economic Papers, MIT Press, pages 1-26.
    5. Il Houng Lee & Xu Qingjun & Murtaza H Syed, 2013. "China’s Demography and its Implications," IMF Working Papers 13/82, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Jane Golley & Rod Tyers, 2011. "Contrasting Giants: Demographic Change and Economic Performance in China and India," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 11-04, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    7. Marga Peeters & Loek Groot, 2012. "A Global View On Demographic Pressure And Labour Market Participation," Journal of Global Economy, Research Centre for Social Sciences,Mumbai, India, pages 165-194.
    8. Marga Peeters & Loek Groot, 2012. "A Global View On Demographic Pressure And Labour Market Participation," Journal of Global Economy, Research Centre for Social Sciences,Mumbai, India, pages 165-194.

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