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The Flow of Household Funds in Japan

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  • Charles Yuji Horioka

    (PRI)

Abstract

In this paper, I consider why Japans household saving rate was so high in the past and why it has shown a downward trend in more recent years, and based on this analysis, I project future trends in Japans household saving rate. To preview my main findings, I find, first, that Japans household saving rate used to be high but that it has declined sharply in recent years and that it is no longer high in either absolute or relative terms. Moreover, Japans household saving rate will continue its decline due to the rapid aging of her population and other factors and may well become zero or negative within a few years. However, the governments fiscal deficits (government dissaving) as well as corporate investment in plant and equipment can be expected to decline at the same time, and moreover, there is always the option of borrowing from abroad, so the sharp decline in the household saving rate will not necessarily cause any problems.

Suggested Citation

  • Charles Yuji Horioka, 2008. "The Flow of Household Funds in Japan," Microeconomics Working Papers 22599, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:eab:microe:22599
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    File URL: http://www.eaber.org/node/22599
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Horioka, C.Y., 1989. "The Determinants Of Japan'S Saving Rate: The Impact Of The Age Structure Of The Population And Other Factors," ISER Discussion Paper 0189, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
    2. Charles Yuji Horioka, 2002. "Are the Japanese Selfish, Altruistic or Dynastic?," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 53(1), pages 26-54.
    3. C. Y. Horioka & H. Fujisaki & W. Watanabe & T. Kouno, 2000. "Are Americans More Altruistic than the Japanese? A U.S.-Japan Comparison of Saving and Bequest Motives," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(1), pages 1-31.
    4. Horioka, Charles Yuji, 1990. "Why is Japan's household saving rate so high? A literature survey," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 4(1), pages 49-92, March.
    5. Horioka, Charles Yuji, 1992. "Future trends in Japan's saving rate and the implications thereof for Japan's external imbalance," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 3(4), pages 307-330, April.
    6. Charles Yuji Horioka, 2004. "Are the Japanese Unique? An Analysis of Consumption and Saving Behavior in Japan," ISER Discussion Paper 0606, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
    7. Charles Yuji Horioka, 2006. "Do the Elderly Dissave in Japan?," Chapters,in: Long-run Growth and Short-run Stabilization, chapter 5 Edward Elgar Publishing.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Charles Yuji Horioka, 2016. "Is Imbalances And Current Account Surpluses In Japan: In Memory Of Professor Ronald I. Mckinnon," The Singapore Economic Review (SER), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 61(02), pages 1-17, June.
    2. FUKAO Kyoji & IKEUCHI Kenta & KWON Hyeog Ug & YoungGak KIM & MAKINO Tatsuji & TAKIZAWA Miho, 2015. "Lessons from Japan's Secular Stagnation," Discussion papers 15124, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    3. Guanghua Wan & Peter J. Morgan & Kyoji Fukao & Tangjun Yuan, 2016. "China's Growth Slowdown: Lessons from Japan's Experience and the Expected Impact on Japan, the USA and Germany," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 24(5), pages 122-146, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    household saving; Japan;

    JEL classification:

    • D14 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Saving; Personal Finance
    • D10 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - General

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