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Do the Elderly Dissave in Japan?


  • Charles Yuji Horioka


In this paper, I summarize Albert Ando's seminal and ingenious work on the saving behavior of the elderly in Japan and then present some pertinent data and evidence that became available only after Ando did his work in this area. I conclude that the retired elderly in Japan dissave, in accordance with the life cycle hypothesis of saving, and that all of the available data and evidence suggest that the life cycle hypothesis of saving is highly applicable in the case of Japan.

Suggested Citation

  • Charles Yuji Horioka, 2004. "Do the Elderly Dissave in Japan?," ISER Discussion Paper 0605, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
  • Handle: RePEc:dpr:wpaper:0605

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Horioka, Charles Yuji & Kasuga, Norihiro & Yamazaki, Katsuyo & Watanabe, Wako, 1996. "Do the Aged Dissave in Japan? Evidence from Micro Data," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 10(3), pages 295-311, September.
    2. C. Y. Horioka & H. Fujisaki & W. Watanabe & T. Kouno, 2000. "Are Americans More Altruistic than the Japanese? A U.S.-Japan Comparison of Saving and Bequest Motives," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(1), pages 1-31.
    3. Charles Yuji Horioka, 2002. "Are the Japanese Selfish, Altruistic or Dynastic?," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 53(1), pages 26-54.
    4. Hayashi, Fumio & Ando, Albert & Ferris, Richard, 1988. "Life cycle and bequest savings A study of Japanese and U.S. households based on data from the 1984 NSFIE and the 1983 survey of consumer finances," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 2(4), pages 450-491, December.
    5. Ishikawa, Tsuneo, 1988. "Saving and labor supply behavior of aged households in Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 2(4), pages 417-449, December.
    6. Horioka, Charles Yuji & Watanabe, Wako, 1997. "Why Do People Save? A Micro-Analysis of Motives for Household Saving in Japan," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 107(442), pages 537-552, May.
    7. Horioka, C.Y., 1991. "Saving in Japan," ISER Discussion Paper 0248, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
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    Cited by:

    1. Charles Yuji HORIOKA & Wataru SUZUKI & Tatsuo HATTA, 2007. "Aging, Savings, and Public Pensions in Japan," Asian Economic Policy Review, Japan Center for Economic Research, vol. 2(2), pages 303-319.
    2. Charles Yuji Horioka, 2008. "The Flow of Household Funds in Japan," Public Policy Review, Policy Research Institute, Ministry of Finance Japan, vol. 4(1), pages 37-52, December.
    3. Ray Forrest & Yosuke Hirayama, 2009. "The Uneven Impact of Neoliberalism on Housing Opportunities," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 33(4), pages 998-1013, December.
    4. Charles Yuji Horioka, 2007. "A Survey of Household Saving Behavior in Japan," ISER Discussion Paper 0684, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.

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