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Intergenerational transmission of fertility outcomes in Spain

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  • Marina Morales

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to analyze whether parents' fertility behavior may be an important determinant of the future fertility outcomes of their children in Spain. To address this issue, we use data from the Survey of Living Conditions. Our results confirm the intergenerational transmission of fertility behavior in Spain. The higher the parents’ number of children, the higher the number of children that individuals have. We find that individuals from regions where parents have few children may have 0.02 fewer children, because of differences in parental fertility, than those individuals living in regions whose parents have a large number of children, which represents 7% of the difference in fertility across regions.

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  • Marina Morales, 2021. "Intergenerational transmission of fertility outcomes in Spain," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 89(4), pages 315-329, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:manchs:v:89:y:2021:i:4:p:315-329
    DOI: 10.1111/manc.12366
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