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Utilizing Microsimulation to Estimate the Private and Fiscal Returns to Education: Ireland 1987–2011

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  • Darragh Flannery
  • Cathal O'Donoghue

Abstract

This study estimates both the fiscal and net private return to education using microsimulation models. This is carried out empirically using Irish data across the period 1987–2011. The results indicate that a more generous tax/benefit system, combined with a greater state burden of education costs initially helped increase the individual's return to education, while reducing the state return from investing in education. However, this trend is reversed by 2011 as significant changes to the Irish tax/benefit system were introduced. The methodology utilized allows us to analyse the specific impact of various components of the tax/benefit system upon these returns.

Suggested Citation

  • Darragh Flannery & Cathal O'Donoghue, 2016. "Utilizing Microsimulation to Estimate the Private and Fiscal Returns to Education: Ireland 1987–2011," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 84(1), pages 55-80, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:manchs:v:84:y:2016:i:1:p:55-80
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/manc.12088
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Bercholz, Maxime & FitzGerald, John, 2016. "Recent Trends in Female Labour Force Participation in Ireland," Quarterly Economic Commentary: Special Articles, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).

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