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Youth Training Programs and Their Impact on Career and Spell Duration of Professional Soccer Players

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  • Mihailo Radoman
  • Marcel C. Voia

Abstract

A unique data set of post-war English trained soccer players is used to study the impact of the youth training program they attended on their career and spell duration. Duration models in the spirit of Abbring and van den Berg are employed to estimate local treatment effects of different training programs on players — survival in the top European leagues. The results indicate that the duration patterns of players are dependent on the youth academy they attended. Certain clubs, with a well-established reputation in developing youth talent, outperform others in terms of producing and evaluating the ability of their youth players to succeed in top European leagues. The spell analysis outlines the nature of the competitive environment in which smaller clubs have a chance to keep up with the larger ones in terms of producing and holding on to homegrown talent. Finally, the results of both analyses addressed unobserved heterogeneity, allowed for nonlinearity of covariates using the cubic spline methodology, and were tested for endogeneity bias using a split sample test.

Suggested Citation

  • Mihailo Radoman & Marcel C. Voia, 2015. "Youth Training Programs and Their Impact on Career and Spell Duration of Professional Soccer Players," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 29(2), pages 163-193, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:29:y:2015:i:2:p:163-193
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/labr.12049
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Mihailo Radoman & Marcel-Cristian Voia, 2015. "Internal Promotion in Competitive Sports: Evidence from the English Premier League," Carleton Economic Papers 15-09, Carleton University, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C14 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Semiparametric and Nonparametric Methods: General
    • C41 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Duration Analysis; Optimal Timing Strategies
    • C52 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Evaluation, Validation, and Selection
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J44 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Professional Labor Markets and Occupations

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